Lessons on the Noun Phrase in English: From Representation to Reference

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Sep 16, 2009 - History - 405 pages
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Distinguishing the components that make up the meaning of a noun enables us to understand what permits us to say "Ground temperature plus one degrees," or to invent "small is beautiful." A careful look at the meaning and role of -'s and of words like a/the, any/some, this/that, often found in noun phrases, reveals how they refer to the speaker's message. Examining pronouns pin-points the fundamental role of the representation of a grammatical person in all noun phrases.
 

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Contents

1 What We Are Going to Talk about and How
3
The Theory of Incidence
16
3 Parts of Speech and the Word
36
4 Case and the Substantive
53
Toward the System
68
Testing for Morpheme
89
Testing for s Morpheme
105
8 Gender in the Substantive
126
16 The Demonstratives
270
17 Determiners as Completive Pronouns
292
18 s Phrase
302
19 Suppletive Pronouns as Noun Phrase
316
20 Personal Pronouns and the Expression of Gender
332
21 The Noun Phrase and Person
348
22 Syntactic Function
358
23 Concluding Remarks
368

9 The Substantive
147
10 The System of the Articles
160
11 A vs the in Discourse
175
12 Bare vs Articled s Substantives
197
13 Bare vs Articled Substantives
214
14 Any as a Quantifier
234
15 Some and the System
250
Postscript
376
Glossary
379
Notes
383
References
395
Index
403
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About the author (2009)

Walter Hirtle is professeur associe at l'Universite Laval, Quebec City, and the author of several books, including Lessons on the English Verb: No Expression without Representation and Language in the Mind: An Introduction to Guillaume's Theory.

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