Letter to a Christian Nation

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 2008 - Religion - 120 pages
1714 Reviews
From the new afterword by the author:Humanity has had a long fascination with blood sacrifice. In fact, it has been by no means uncommon for a child to be born into this world only to be patiently and lovingly reared by religious maniacs, who believe that the best way to keep the sun on its course or to ensure a rich harvest is to lead him by tender hand into a field or to a mountaintop and bury, butcher, or burn him alive as offering to an invisible God. The notion that Jesus Christ died for our sins and that his death constitutes a successful propitiation of a “loving” God is a direct and undisguised inheritance of the superstitious bloodletting that has plagued bewildered people throughout history. . .
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
671
4 stars
541
3 stars
273
2 stars
122
1 star
107

Review: Letter to a Christian Nation

User Review  - Shane Culliton - Goodreads

Great book. I've been a listener of Sam Harris' for quite some time in this subject, so I'd heard most of these points made before via other media,but if you haven't spent much time exposing yourself to Sam, this is a good, quick introduction to many of his thought provoking points. Read full review

Review: Letter to a Christian Nation

User Review  - Nick Barefoot - Goodreads

A fantastic little guide that serves as a set of guidelines for defending a secular position to the religious, and also for rationally tearing apart claims stereotypical of Western religion in a ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
93
Section 3
115
Section 4
117
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Sam Harris is the author of the New York Times best seller, The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason, which won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. He is a graduate in philosophy from Stanford University and has studied both Eastern and Western religious traditions, along with a variety of contemplative disciplines, for twenty years. Mr. Harris is now completing a doctorate in neuroscience, studying the neural basis of belief, disbelief, and uncertainty with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). His work has been discussed in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Economist, and New Scientist, among many other journals, and he has made television appearances on The O'Reilly Factor, Scarborough Country, Faith Under Fire, and Book TV.

Bibliographic information