Letters and Papers of Charles, Lord Barham: Admiral of the Red Squadron, 1758-1813, Volume 32

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Navy records society, 1907 - Admirals - 422 pages
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Page 259 - I have no doubt but considerable aids may be drawn hence, for your army, unless a larger one should be embodied in the South, than the force of the enemy there seems to call for. I have the honor to be, with every sentiment of respect and esteem, your Excellency's Most obedient humble servant.* TO GENERAL EDWARD STEVENS.
Page 234 - I have the honour to be, with great regard, Sir, Your most obedient, humble servant, JW GOETHE.
Page 114 - I judged it improper to dare the enemy to battle any longer, not having the least prospect of beating a fleet of twenty-four sail of the line of capital ships ; and knowing the consequence of my being beaten would probably be the loss of all his Majesty's possessions in this country, I thought it my indispensable duty to bear up, and made the signal for it at 8 o'clock.
Page liii - I had been assured by a captain of an American vessel. As it plainly appeared to me that His Majesty's territories, fleet and army in America were in imminent danger of being overpowered...
Page 425 - Papers, and The Naval Miscellany, are The Journal of Captain (afterwards Sir John) Narbrough, 1672-73 ; Official Documents illustrating...
Page 329 - Plymouth, for a small squadron, where, at this season of the year, they might be lodged under tents, the communication with the shore there quick and easy, and plenty of every kind of refreshment. Four line-of-battle ships and a frigate, which lately joined us at sea, are brought in to add to our embarrassment at Spithead. Had they been cruizing for short intervals, putting in from time to time at Plymouth or Torbay, they would have been in the way to have annoyed the enemy and protected our trade,...
Page 293 - I have scarce time to write to you ; a perpetual hurry prevails here, which, from the natural consequence of hurry, produces nothing to the purpose. In confidence, I must inform you the confused conduct here is such that I tremble for the event. There is no forethought, therefore no events provided against ; we are every day, from morning till night, plagued and puzzled in minutiae, whilst essentials are totally neglected. An odd obstinacy and way of negativing everything proposed, makes all advice...
Page 382 - Sawyer, esq. vice admiral of [SEAL.] the blue, and- commander in chief of his majesty's ships and vessels employed and to be •employed in the...
Page 161 - I was most exceedingly disappointed in and mortified at the commander-in-chief. In the first instance, for not making the signal for a general chase the moment he hauled that down for the line of battle...
Page 160 - I was fairly l within point blank, when I opened such a tremendous fire as he could not stand for more than ten minutes, when he struck.