Letters from Egypt, 1863-65

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Macmillan, 1865 - Egypt - 371 pages
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Contents

I
v
II
1
III
3
IV
9
V
24
VI
27
VII
36
VIII
41
XXIX
137
XXX
142
XXXI
145
XXXII
153
XXXIII
167
XXXIV
177
XXXV
187
XXXVI
196

IX
43
X
48
XI
56
XII
58
XIII
61
XIV
70
XV
73
XVI
74
XVII
77
XVIII
88
XIX
92
XX
98
XXI
110
XXII
111
XXIII
112
XXIV
116
XXV
118
XXVI
120
XXVII
126
XXVIII
133
XXXVII
199
XXXVIII
217
XXXIX
229
XL
245
XLI
254
XLII
269
XLIII
275
XLIV
282
XLV
291
XLVI
301
XLVII
305
XLVIII
312
XLIX
317
L
334
LI
338
LII
341
LIII
349
LIV
355
LV
361
LVI
369

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Page 127 - a brother of girls,' as Mr. Power once called you? And, when I asked what he meant, he said the Arabs call a man that who has 'a clean heart to love all women as his sisters, and strength and courage to fight for their protection!
Page 231 - Wallahee ! she can always amuse him at home. And as to my lady, the thing is not that she does not know. When I feel my stomach tightened, I go to the divan and say to her, ' Do you want anything — a pipe or sherbet or...
Page 181 - TRAVELLERS. 181 that the differences of manners are a sort of impassable gulf; — the truth being that their feelings and passions are just like our own. It is curious that all the old books of travels that I have read mention the natives of strange countries in a far more natural tone, and with far more attempt to discriminate character, than modern ones. — eg Carsten Niebuhr's Travels here and in Arabia, Cook's Voyages, and many others.
Page 331 - Kamadan, in the place where they bury strangers, on the site of a former Coptic church. Archdeacon Moore read the service ; Omar and I spread my old English flag over 'the bier, and Copts and Muslims helped to carry the poor stranger. It was a most impressive sight : the party of Europeans — all strangers to the dead, but all deeply moved ; the group of black-robed and turbaned Copts, the sailors from the boats, the gaily-dressed dragomans, several brown-shirted Fellaheen, and the thick crowd of...
Page 139 - I met Hassan, the janissary of the American Consulate, a very respectable good man. He told me he had married another wife since last year. I asked, What for? It was the widow of his brother, who had always lived in the same house with him, like one family, and who died, leaving two boys. She is neither young nor handsome, but he considered it his duty to provide for her and the children, and not let her marry a stranger.
Page 104 - Viceroy granted, eight years ago, certain uncultivated lands to a good many Turks, his employes, — in hopes of founding a landed aristocracy, and inducing them to spend their capital in cultivation. They did so ; and now...
Page 103 - Oh, but nothing could be done without forced labour," and the poor Fellaheen are marched off in gangs like convicts, and their families starve, and (who would have thought it I) the population keeps diminishing. No wonder the cry is, " Let the English Queen come and take us.
Page 82 - (green one) in the bazaar, go wild in the mosques, laugh at portly Turks and dignified sheykhs on their white donkeys, drink sherbet in the streets, ride wildly about on a donkey, peer under black veils at beautiful eyes, and feel generally intoxicated ! I am quite a good cicerone now of the glorious old city.
Page 169 - Yoosuf, who came up, said he presumed I worshipped God and not stones, and that sincere prayers were good anywhere. Clearly the bigotry would have been on my side if I had refused any longer, so in the evening I went with Mustafa. It was a very curious sight : the little dome illuminated with as much oil as the mosque could afford, over the tombs of Abu1-Hajjaj and his three sons.
Page 268 - (I beg pardon of God) seven times a day. I wish the English could know how unpleasant and mischievous their manner of talking to their servants about religion is. Omar confided to me how bad it felt to be questioned and then to see the Englishman laugh, or put up his lip and say nothing. " I don't want to talk about his religion at all, but if he talks about mine, he ought to speak of his own too. You, my lady, say when I tell you things, ' that is the same with us,' or, that is different, or good...

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