Letters from W. H. Hudson, 1901-1922

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E. P. Dutton, 1923 - Naturalists - 295 pages
A young boy who loves practical jokes and games finds himself in the strange land of Limbo where the only way out is to play a complicated game.
 

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Page 185 - Morgans interested me greatly, but I don't think it will interest the reading public one bit. It interested me because of my esteem and affection for him (and my admiration too) also because I believe he has taken the wrong path and is wandering lost in the vast wilderness ... He is essentially a poet...
Page 3 - I went up to Hudson and told him that he had written a masterpiece. Its grave beauty, its tragic sweetness, indeed, had swept me off my feet, as it does now when I read it. Hudson glared at me astonished, as though he wished to annihilate me and asked my name. I told him, adding, 'It's my last day here. Where can I meet you?
Page 273 - ... woman who was capable of a horrible crime and who was yet essentially noble in spirit. But as to its being a story of a thousand years ago, that doesn't matter at all seeing that human passions then were what they are to-day and always, and all the archaeology stuff is left out. You must say Use it or Burn it and I'll obey.
Page 237 - The sexual passion is the central thought in the "Crystal Age": the idea that there is no millenium, no rest, no perpetual peace till that fury has burnt itself out, and I gave unlimited time for the change.
Page 271 - Oneyda chief His descant wildly thus begun : " But that I may not stain with grief The death-song of my father's son, Or bow this head in...
Page 5 - His tall dark figure, his brusque vivid talk, his magnetic eyes, his strength of manner and the spice of mystery in his movements captivated his hearers».2 El intenso poder vital que fluía de su presencia, la intimidad de su tono al hablar y la impresión de cercanía que provocaba en los demás poseían una gracia irresistible y estimulante. Sus amigos le eran de una lealtad insobornable; pero eran muy pocos. No todos le aceptaban y le sentían...
Page 181 - I had just read your favourite author's Sons and Lovers. A very good book indeed except in that portion where he relapses into the old sty — the necksucking and wallowing in sweating flesh. It is like an obsession, a madness, but he may outlive it as so many other writers have done. Paul and his mother are extraordinarily vivid and live in one's mind like people one has known. Only they seem more real than most of the human beings one meets.
Page 180 - I'm about as bad as one can be without being down altogether. Still I hope to stay on to see the flame of war brighten in this peace-rotten land. It will look very beautiful to many watchers and have a wonderful purifying effect.
Page 61 - Compound for sins I am inclined to, By damning those I have no mind to...
Page 152 - Thanks for your letter you said so much in praise of A Shepherd's Life I had to wait to get cool before replying. But you are always too generous to your friends and (I can't help thinking) especially to me. The reason of it is that you are to some extent under an illusion. A man is so much better than his books ! - take the best thing you have done - don't you feel how little of all the best in you it contains - and that little how poorly expressed? I don't like even to look at a book of mine after...

About the author (1923)

William Henry Hudson was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina on August 4, 1841 to American parents. He developed a heart condition as a teenager and finally moved to England in 1870. He wrote several novels including The Purple Land, El Ombú, and Green Mansions. He also published numerous books on ornithology and the English countryside including Argentine Ornithology, British Birds, Afoot in England, A Shepherd's Life, Dead Man's Plack, A Traveller in Little Things, and A Hind in Richmond Park. He died on August 18, 1922.

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