Letters of a War Correspondent

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L.C. Page, 1898 - United States - 397 pages
This book contains a collection of letters written by a war correspondent.
 

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Page 360 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 363 - Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other.
Page 363 - Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off...
Page 348 - But thou hast saved us from our enemies, and hast put them to shame that hated us.
Page 75 - Lee's army is really whipped. The prisoners we now take show it, and the action of his army shows it unmistakably. A battle with them outside of intrenchments cannot be had. Our men feel that they have gained the morale over the enemy, and attack him with confidence. I may be mistaken, but I feel that our success over Lee's army is already assured. The promptness and rapidity with which you have forwarded reinforcements has contributed largely to the feeling of confidence inspired in our men, and...
Page 269 - ... sheep. This destruction embraces the Luray Valley and Little Fort Valley, as well as the main .Valley. A large number of horses have been obtained, a proper estimate of which I cannot now make. Lieutenant John R. Meigs, my engineer officer, was murdered beyond Harrisonburg, near Dayton. For this atrocious act all the houses within an area of five miles were burned.
Page 215 - Whoso findeth a wife findeth a good thing and obtaineth favor of the Lord,
Page 332 - Suddenly, as if by magic, the streets became filled with men, walking as though for a wager, and behind them excited negroes with trunks, bundles, and luggage of every description. All over the city, it was the same — wagons, trunks, bandboxes, and their owners, a mass of hurrying fugitives, filling the streets.

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