Letters on Occult Meditation

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Lucis Publishing Companies, Dec 13, 2011 - Body, Mind & Spirit

The word occultism is used in the Alice Bailey books with one specific meaning: The study of that which is hidden. In occult meditation we learn to penetrate into hitherto veiled dimensions of consciousness, discovering the threefold function of the mind and the qualities of the true inner self, the soul. This type of meditation is particularly concerned with energy flow - energy which is impersonal and fiery in nature. Its potential dangers should therefore be understood and avoided, and practices adopted which are safe and trustworthy. This book sets out the basic principles of occult meditation, showing its overall objective to be planetary service. 

 

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Contents

Cover
THE ALIGNMENT OF THE EGO WITH
POINTS CONSIDERED WHEN
THE USE OF THE SACRED WORD
DANGERS TO BE AVOIDED
THE USE OF FORM IN MEDITATION
THE USE OF COLOUR AND SOUND
ACCESS TO THE MASTERS
FUTURE SCHOOLS OF MEDITATION
THE PURIFICATION OF THE VEHICLES
THE RESULTANT LIFE OF SERVICE
THE ARCANE SCHOOL
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

An extract from the Tibetan teacher, written in 1934 briefly explains the intent of these teachings: “The books that I have written are sent out with no claim for their acceptance. They may, or may not, be correct, true and useful. It is for you to ascertain their truth by right practice and by the exercise of the intuition. Neither I nor A.A.B. is the least interested in having them acclaimed as inspired writing, or in having anyone speak of them (with bated breath) as being the work of one of the masters. If they present truth in such a way that it follows sequentially upon that already offered in the world teachings, if the information given raises the aspiration and the will to serve from the plane of the emotions to that of the mind (the plane whereon the Masters can be found) then they will have served their purpose. If the teaching conveyed calls forth a response from the illumined mind of the worker in the world, and brings a flashing forth of the intuition, then let that teaching be accepted. But not otherwise. If the statements meet with eventual corroboration, or are deemed true under the test of the Law of Correspondences, then that is well and good. But should this not be so, let not the student accept what is said.” 

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