Letters to Catherine E. Beecher: In Reply to An Essay on Slavery and Abolitionism, Addressed to A. E. Grimké

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Isaac Knapp, 1838 - Slavery - 130 pages
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Page 38 - The prophet that hath a dream, let him tell a dream : and he that hath my word let him speak my word faithfully. What is the chaff to the wheat ? saith the Lord. Is not my word like as a fire ? saith the Lord ; and like a hammer that breaketh the rock in pieces ? Therefore, behold, I am against the prophets, saith the Lord, that steal my words, every one from his neighbour.
Page 106 - Joel ; and it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my spirit upon all flesh ; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams ; and on my servants and on my handmaidens I will pour out in those days of my Spirit, and they shall prophesy.
Page 9 - We, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, to establish justice, to insure domestic tranquillity, to provide for the common defence, to promote the general welfare, and to secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Page 11 - Is it not to deal thy bread to the hungry, and that thou bring the poor that are cast out to thy house? when thou seest the naked, that thou cover him; and that thou hide not thyself from thine own flesh?
Page 12 - Nevertheless, to avoid fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.
Page 32 - But that deep feeling of evils, which is necessary to effectual conflict with them, and which marks God's most powerful messengers to mankind, cannot breathe itself in soft and tender accents. The deeply moved soul will speak strongly, and ought to speak so as to move and shake nations.
Page 118 - WHATSOEVER IT is MORALLY RIGHT FOR A MAN TO DO, IT is MORALLY RIGHT FOR A WOMAN TO DO...
Page 12 - For all this his anger is not turned away, but his hand is stretched out still : woe unto them that decree unrighteous decrees, and that write grievousness which they have prescribed; to turn aside the needy from judgment, and to take away the right from the poor of my people, that widows may be their prey, and that they may rob the fatherless...
Page 57 - If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong to thy peace ! but now they are hid from thine eyes.
Page 88 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

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