Letters to a Young Scientist

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, Apr 15, 2013 - Science - 256 pages

Pulitzer Prize–winning biologist Edward O. Wilson imparts the wisdom of his storied career to the next generation.

Edward O. Wilson has distilled sixty years of teaching into a book for students, young and old. Reflecting on his coming-of-age in the South as a Boy Scout and a lover of ants and butterflies, Wilson threads these twenty-one letters, each richly illustrated, with autobiographical anecdotes that illuminate his career—both his successes and his failures—and his motivations for becoming a biologist. At a time in human history when our survival is more than ever linked to our understanding of science, Wilson insists that success in the sciences does not depend on mathematical skill, but rather a passion for finding a problem and solving it. From the collapse of stars to the exploration of rain forests and the oceans’ depths, Wilson instills a love of the innate creativity of science and a respect for the human being’s modest place in the planet’s ecosystem in his readers.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Daumari - www.librarything.com

I saw this at the library and it seemed Highly Relevant to my current interests/life situation. From the prologue (titled You Made the Right Choice) through the end, E.O. Wilson counsels budding ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DLMorrese - LibraryThing

This is a personal account of the life of an eminent entomologist (he studied ants). It is partly a autobiographical story of how he rose from being a child in the southern U.S. to a professor of ... Read full review

Contents

PROLOGUE
Mathematics
IITHE CREATIVE PROCESS
A LIFE IN SCIENCE
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Edward O. Wilson is widely recognized as one of the world’s preeminent biologists and naturalists. The author of more than thirty books, including Half-Earth, The Social Conquest of Earth, The Meaning of Human Existence, and Letters to a Young Scientist, Wilson is a professor emeritus at Harvard University. The winner of two Pulitzer Prizes, he lives with his wife, Irene Wilson, in Lexington, Massachusetts.

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