Letters to and from the Government of Madras: Relative to the Disturbances in Canara, in April, 1837, with Some Explanatory Notes. To which is Prefixed a Letter to the Honourable the Court of Directors of the East India Company

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Page 34 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon' them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and colour to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Page 170 - Were there a species of creatures intermingled with men, which, though rational, were possessed of such inferior strength, both of body and mind, that they were incapable of all resistance, and could never, upon the highest provocation, make us feel the effects of their resentment...
Page 9 - ... be taken in arms, in open hostility to the British Government, or in the act of opposing, by force of arms, the authority of the same, or in the actual commission of any overt act of rebellion against the state, or in the act of openly aiding and abetting the enemies of the British Government within any part of the said territories.
Page 170 - ... the one side, and servile obedience on the other. Whatever we covet, they must instantly resign. Our permission is the only tenure by which they hold their possessions : Our compassion and kindness the only check by which they curb our lawless will : And as no inconvenience ever results from the exercise of a power so firmly established in nature, the restraints of justice and property, being totally useless, would never have place in so unequal a confederacy.
Page 9 - Government ; and whereas it may be expedient, that during the existence of any war in which the British Government in India .may be engaged with any power whatever, as well as during the existence of open rebellion against the authority of the Government, in any part of the British territories subject to the government of the Presidency of Bombay, the Governor in Council should declare and establish martial law within any part of the territories aforesaid...
Page 10 - It is hereby further declared, that any person born, or residing under the protection of the British Government, within the territories aforesaid, and consequently owing allegiance to the said* Government, who, in violation of the...
Page 194 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Page 170 - ... any restraint of justice with regard to them, nor could they possess any right or property exclusive of such arbitrary lords. Our intercourse with them could not be called society, which supposes a degree of equality; but absolute command on the one side, and servile obedience on the other. Whatever we covet, they must instantly resign. Our permission is the only tenure by which they hold their possessions: Our compassion and kindness the only check by which they curb our lawless will...
Page 10 - INDIA. adjudged by a court-martial to be guilty of any of the crimes specified in this regulation shall also forfeit to the British Government all property and effects, real and personal, which they shall have possessed within its territories at the time when the crime of which they may be convicted shall have been committed.
Page 9 - Government or shall be taken in the act of opposing by force of arms the authority of the same, or...

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