Letters Written on Board His Majesty's Ship the Northumberland, and at Saint Helena: In which the Conduct and Conversations of Napoleon Buonaparte, and His Suite, During the Voyage and the First Months of His Residence in that Island, are Faithfully Described and Related

Front Cover
author, 1816 - France - 215 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 145 - I accordingly refused an order for the proposed arrest, by the following intimation to the Minister of Police: You have named Pichegru, Georges, and Moreau : convince me • that the former is in Paris, and I will immediately cause the latter to be arrested.— Another, and a very singular circumstance, led to the developement of the plot.
Page 162 - ... instantly fixed upon a pole, and insultingly exposed to the view of the French army. At the sight of this horrid and unexpected object, the indignation of the soldiers knew no bounds : they were perfectly infuriated; and, with the most eager impatience, demanded to be led on to the storm. I did not hesitate, under such circumstances, to command it. The attack was dreadful; and the carnage exceeded any action I had then witnessed.
Page 132 - I bowed in return ; when he stretched out his hand, saying, " I have got , , a fever." I immediately applied my hand 1 the wrist, and observing, both from the regularity of the pulsation and the jocular expression of his countenance, that he was exercising a little of his pleasantry, I expressed my wish that his health might always remain the same.
Page 144 - At this eventful period of my life I had succeeded in restoring order and tranquillity to a kingdom torn asunder by faction, and deluged in blood. That nation had placed me at their head. I came not as your Cromwell did, or your third Richard. No such thing. I found a crown in the kennel ; I cleansed it from its filth, and placed it on my head. My safety now became necessary to preserve that tranquillity so recently restored, and hitherto so satisfactorily preserved, as the leading characters of...
Page 132 - a very good state of health, which I attribute to a rigorous observance of regimen. My appetite is such that I feel as if I could eat at any time of the day: but I am regular in my meals; and always leave off eating with an appetite : besides, I never, as you know, drink strong wines. — With respect to the English language...
Page 28 - Thuilleries, when giving audience to his Marshals or Officers of State. He never moves his hands from their habitual places in his dress, but to apply them to his snuff-box ; and it struck me as a particular circumstance, to which I paid an observing attention, though it might have been connected with his former dignity, — That he never offered a pinch to any one with whom he was conversing. — On the subsequent day he breakfasted at eleven. His meal consists of meat and claret, which is closed...
Page 24 - Metteruich the Austrian Minister. It was dated in the preceding April, and the diplomatic writer stated the decided object of his Imperial Master, to be the final expulsion of Napoleon the First from the throne of France; and that the French nation should be left to their uninterrupted decision, whether they would have a monarchy under Napoleon the Second, or adopt a Republican form of Government. — Austria professed to have no right, and consequently felt no intention to dictate to the French...
Page 61 - We met," continued Las Cases, " in a small room, to discuss and come to a final determination on this momentous subject ; nor shall I attempt to describe the anxiety visible on the countenances of our small assembly.— The Emperor alone retained an unembarrassed look, when he calmly demanded the opinions of his chosen band of followers, as to his future conduct. The majority were in favour of his returning to the army, as in the South of France his cause still appeared to wear a favourable aspect....
Page 104 - On an elevated mound, about fifty yard* from the house, is a Gothic building, having one room below, and two small apartments above. This Masonette Napoleon chose for his residence, till Longwood could be completed. There was no choice in the arrangement of this confined abode : the groundfloor was, of course, occupied by him, while De las Cases, with his son, who was a page, and the valet in waiting were to possess the upper story, ' A few days after he had fixed his residence at the Briars, I called...
Page 156 - The occupation of this town for any length of time was totally impracticable, from the force that Jezza Pacha was enabled to bring forward. The sick and wounded were numerous ; and their removal was my first consideration. Carriages the most convenient that could be. formed were appropriated to the purpose. Some of them were sent by water to Damietta, and the rest were accommodated, in the best possible manner, to accompany their comrades in their march across the Desert.

Bibliographic information