Life, Journals and Correspondence of Rev. Manasseh Cutler, LL. D.

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R. Clarke & Company, 1888 - Northwest, Old
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Excellent, truly excellent account of the forming of the Ohio Company of Associates and also of this man who is largely unknown today. I like, particularly, the account of the forming of the company, the negotiations with the federal government at the time and then the descriptions of actually getting settlers to Ohio. Cutler has a very interesting and surprising description of Benjamin Franklin, too. By that I mean he expected from Franklin's reputation to meet this rather striking looking man. Instead, he found an old, short, bald man who physically did not at all reflect his public reputation or image. His explanation of all that came to play to form the Ohio Company, too, and especially support by the new state of Virginia, as a barrier against Indian attacks, and by Gen. George Washington who wanted it as an opportunity for his former soldiers and also to increase the value of his own land along the Ohio River. Well done! You will be as impressed with Dr. Cutler as I was.
John Meekins
 

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Page 366 - of Incorporation from one of the states or from Congress. The land purchase was therefore a private contract. The following provisions in the Ordinance may be regarded as a full equivalent for a public charter : "And in the just preservation of rights and property it is understood and declared, that no law ought ever to be made or have force in said
Page 336 - of Congress, claiming that the unsettled country, if " wrested from the common enemy by the blood and treasure of the thirteen States, should be considered a common property, subject to be parceled out by Congress into free, convenient, and independent governments, in such manner and at such times as the wisdom of that assembly shall
Page 458 - Whether this desirable object will be best promoted by affording aids to seminaries of learning already established, by the institution of a national University, or by any other expedients, will be well worthy of a place in the deliberations of the Legislature.
Page 151 - they cull the ingratitude of the public, involved in debts, without one farthing of money to carry them home after having spent the flower of their days, and many of them, their patrimonies, in establishing the freedom and independence of their country, and suffering
Page 339 - country as a motive to settle there. He says: "In the ordinance of Congress for the government of the territory North-west of the Ohio, it is provided that, after said territory acquires a certain degree of population, it shall be divided into states. The Eastern state that is thus provided to be made is
Page 336 - a common property, subject to be parceled out by Congress into free, convenient, and independent governments, in such manner and at such times as the wisdom of that assembly shall direct.
Page 366 - shall in any manner whatever interfere with or affect private contracts or engagements bona fide and without fraud previously formed.
Page 151 - carry them home after having spent the flower of their days, and many of them, their patrimonies, in establishing the freedom and independence of their country, and suffering every thing that human nature is capable of enduring this side of death ; I repeat it, that when I consider these irritating circumstances, without one thing to soothe
Page 295 - it not worth while to say any thing further to Congress on the subject. This appeared to have the effect I wished. The Committee were mortified, and did not seem to know what to say, but still urged another attempt. I left them in this state, but afterward explained, my views to
Page 268 - /I delivered him my letters. After he had read them, he took me again by the hand, and, with the usual compliments, introduced me to the other gentlemen of the company, who were most of them members of the Convention. Here we entered into a free conversation, and spent our time most agreeably until it was dark./

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