Life Routes: A practical resource for developing life skills with vulnerable young people

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Jan 1, 2006 - Social Science - 96 pages
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Life skills are key to improved outcomes for young people. Young people understand the benefit of negotiating skills, taking responsibility and problem solving, but have difficulty putting them into practice. Life Routes offers practical ideas for helping young people develop their life skills. The 'Life Routes' programme works in school and community settings to help young people, particularly those who are marginalised and vulnerable, develop the skills and confidence they need to achieve positive outcomes. This resource provides guidance, activities and worksheets that can be used with different-sized groups in a range of settings. Life Routes is for practitioners who work with vulnerable young people, aged 13 to 16, in a range of settings. The activities apply recognised active learning methods and are grounded in real-life situations that young people tell us are relevant to their everyday lives.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Making it work
8
Assessment accreditation and evaluation
15
Icebreakers
20
Creative assessment
24
Setting the scene
28
Being healthy enjoying good physical and mental health and living a healthy lifestyle
31
Staying safe being protected from harm and neglect and growing up able to look after themselves
50
Enjoying and achieving getting the most out of life and developing the broad skills for adulthood
65
Making a positive contribution being involved with the community and societyand not engaging in antisocial or offending behaviour
73
Achieving economic wellbeing not being prevented by social and economic disadvantage from achieving their full potential
86
References
98
Useful resources
99
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About the author (2006)

Roger Bullock is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy at the University of Bristol. He is editor of Adoption and Fostering.

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