Life of Benjamin Silliman, M.D., LL.D., Late Professor of Chemistry, Mineralogy, and Geology in Yale College: Chiefly from His Manuscript Reminiscences, Diaries, and Correspondence, Volume 1

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Page 13 - Then join the saints, wake every cheerful passion: When Christ returns, he comes for your salvation. 51 FIRST PART. LM SHOW pity, Lord; O Lord, forgive, Let a repenting rebel live ; Are not thy mercies large and free ? May not a sinner trust in thee...
Page 100 - He generally occupied a fourth or a third of the hour in recapitulating the subject of the preceding lecture, and thus he advanced at the rate of about forty or forty-five minutes in a day. At the commencement of my first course with him, in 1802, he had just returned from London, where he had been with Davy and other eminent men. He brought with him a galvanic battery of Cruickshank's construction, •—the first that I had ever seen, — but as it contained only fifty pairs of plates, it produced...
Page 101 - The deficiencies of Dr. Woodhouse's courses were, in a considerable degree, made up in a manner which I could not have anticipated. Robert Hare, my fellow-boarder and companion at Mrs. Smith's, was a genial, kind-hearted man, one year younger than myself and was already a proficient in chemistry upon the scale of that period...
Page 93 - ... which occurred to me on the first view of the question of changing professions. On the other hand, the study of Nature appeared very attractive. In her works there is no falsehood, although there are mysteries to unveil, which is a very interesting achievement Everything in Nature is straightforward and consistent There are no polluting influences ; all the associations with these pursuits are elevated and virtuous, and point towards the infinite Creator.
Page 263 - Ruler of the earth and skies, A word of thine Almighty breath Can sink the world, or bid it rise ; Thy smile is life, thy frown is death. 2 When angry nations rush to arms, And rage, and noise, and tumult reign, And war resounds its dire alarms, And slaughter dyes the hostile plain ; 3 Thy sovereign eye looks calmly down, And marks their course, and bounds their power ; Thy law the angry nations own, And noise and war are heard no more.
Page 107 - Speak for yourself, sir," I replied ; " for, although I am accounted a heretic in England, I do believe what you call ' this mummery of Christianity. ' " Dr. Priestley, whom I saw on various occasions, when invited to dine, accepted the invitation, but took out his memorandum-book and noted the engagement, remarking that he had now only an artificial memory.
Page 87 - In the first century of Yale College, a single room was appropriated to apparatus in physics. It was in the old college, second loft, northeast corner, now No. 56. It was papered on the walls ; the floor was sanded, and the window-shutters were always kept closed except when visitors or students were introduced. There was an air of mystery about the room, and we entered it with awe, increasing to admiration after we had seen something of the apparatus and the experiments.
Page 95 - ... appointment] obtained a few books on chemistry and kept them secluded in my secretary, occasionally reading in them privately. This reading did not profit me much. Some general principles were intelligible, but it became at once obvious to me that to see and perform experiments and to become familiar with many substances was indispensable to any progress in chemistry, and of course I must resort to Philadelphia, which presented more advantage to science than any other place in our...
Page 88 - ... when the water has been cooled below the freezing-point before freezing; then, when it actually freezes, the temperature rises to 32 ; and that all this heat must be reabsorbed by the ice when it melts, and then becomes latent, as if it were extinguished, but is again to escape when the ice melts anew. This appeared to me very surprising; and still more astonishing did it appear that boiling water cannot be made any hotter by urging the fire. My curiosity being awakened, I opened an encyclopedia,...
Page 301 - Sereno E. Dwight was with me when a youth, and worked with his characteristic zeal Prof. Chester Dewey and Prof. Robert Hare both operated with me at different times in making potassium, and Dr. Hare in later periods in galvanism. Prof. Amos Eaton passed a winter here in preparation to become a lecturer, and he became a distinguished teacher. With the same view came Prof. William C. Fowler, although he did not follow the profession; and the same was true of Rev. Gamaliel Olds, a gentleman whose mind...

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