Life on Wheels: For the Active Wheelchair User

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O'Reilly, 1999 - Health & Fitness - 549 pages
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Over 1.5 million Americans use wheelchairs for a variety of causes: a congenital condition, traumatic injury, or disease. People who depend upon wheelchairs for mobility are in varied situations. They might live independently or need attendant care; live alone or with family; be employed full-time or no longer working. Despite differences, people dependent on wheelchairs face some similar medical issues and a need to cope with changed circumstances.

Life on Wheels: For the Active Wheelchair Useris for people who want to take charge of their own life experience while using a wheelchair. Author Gary Karp, ergonomics consultant and long-time chair user, describes:

  • Medical issues (paralysis, circulation, rehab experience, choosing the optimal wheelchair, scientific progress toward a cure)
  • Day-to-day living (keeping fit, skin care, bowel and bladder care, sexuality, home access, maintaining a wheelchair, wheeling technique, insurance)
  • Psychological and social issues (grieving loss, self-image, adjustment to life change, friends, family, asking for and being helped, cultural attitudes, history of disability, and activism)

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Contents

Politics and Legislation
419
Getting Out There
447
Resources
501
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

When he was 18, in 1973, Gary fell out of a tree, breaking his spine in mid-back and becoming paraplegic. After his accident, Gary went on to college, graduated, and worked in the computer graphics field. In that field, he started a desktop services division, and conducted training and presentations. In 1992, Gary developed a repetitive strain injury. After recovering, he began his own ergonomics consulting business, Onsight Technology, which offers training and individual workstation consultation to range of clients in the San Francisco Bay Area. Outside work, Gary has been performing music -- guitar, piano and singing -- in local cafes and coffeehouses since he was a teenager and has recorded an album of original guitar music. In 1988 a friend introduced him to juggling, and Gary has been hooked ever since. He enjoys the juggling community, the necessity of making mistakes, pushing the envelope of what you are able to do, the Zen experience of staying in the moment, and juggling with others in passing patterns. He has also produced, performed and emceed at fundraisers and competitions. Gary's first book, Choosing a Wheelchair, was published in the summer of 1998. In his writing, Gary is interested in helping people educate themselves and adapt so that they can have the best quality of life possible.

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