Front Cover
Harper Perennial, 2005 - Blind - 260 pages
49 Reviews
From one of Britain's best-loved literary novelists comes a magical, lyrical tale of the young orphan Silver, taken in by the ancient lighthousekeeper Mr. Pew, who reveals to her a world of myth and mystery through the art of storytelling. Motherless and anchorless, Silver is taken in by the timeless Mr. Pew, keeper of the Cape Wrath lighthouse. Pew tells Silver ancient tales of longing and rootlessness, of the slippages that occur throughout every life. One life, Babel Dark's, a nineteenth-century clergyman, opens like a map that Silver must follow, and the intertwining of myth and reality, of storytelling and experience, lead her through her own particular darkness. A story of mutability, talking birds and stolen books, of Darwin and Stevenson and of the Jekyll and Hyde in all of us, Lighthousekeeping is a way into the most secret recesses of our own hearts and minds. Jeanette Winterson is one of the most extraordinary and original writers of her generation, and this shows her at her lyrical best.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dawsong - LibraryThing

Haigh, Jennifer Mrs. Kimble Fiction The title of this book suggests one person but actually stands for three different women who married the same man consecutively. The weight of the story subtly ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - whybehave2002 - LibraryThing

Almost done with this...I've read the reviews of others who love it and others that love the author. I find it to be a very easy/quick read but the book jumps around a lot and I feel as if I am not ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

Jeanette Winterson was born in Manchester in 1959. She read English at Oxford University before writing her first novel, Oranges are Not the Only Fruit, which was published in 1985.

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