Lights & Shadows of American Life, Volume 3

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Mary Russell Mitford
H. Colburn & R. Bentley, 1832 - Short stories, English
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Page 226 - Oh, my Leddy, then it isna what we hae dune for oursells, but what we hae dune for others, that we think on maist pleasantly.
Page 226 - ... sufferings. Our hearts are waxed light within us then, and we are for righting our ain wrangs and fighting our ain battles.
Page 24 - This is a very sensible stanza, no doubt, and worthy of always being borne in mind ; but it was not exactly what I wanted.
Page 337 - ... of immense value. As they left the shore, they gave the Indian yell; and broke out into a sort of unconnected chorus — commencing with — "Hard upon the beech oar! — She moves too slow! All the way to Shawneetown, Long while ago.
Page 342 - As he was creeping along one morning, with the stealthy tread of a cat, his eye fell upon a beautiful buck, browsing on the edge of a barren spot, three hundred yards distant. The temptation was too strong for the woodsman, and he resolved to have a shot at every hazard. Re-priming his gun, and picking his flint, he made his approaches in the usual noiseless manner. At the moment he reached the spot, from which he meant to take his aim...
Page 343 - He then stepped up to the prostrate savage, and having satisfied himself, that life was extinguished, turned his attention to the buck, and took from the carcass those pieces, suited to the process of jerking. In the meantime, the country was filling up with a white population; and in a few years the red men, with the exception of a few fractions of tribes, gradually receded to the Lakes and beyond the Mississippi. The corps of Scouts was abolished, after having acquired habits, which unfitted them...
Page 334 - I am glad to see you, Mannee!" — continued he in his abrupt manner. "I am going to shoot at the tin cup for a quart — off hand — and you must be judge." I understood Mike at once, and on any other occasion, should have remonstrated, and prevented the daring trial of skill. But I was accompanied by a couple of English tourists, who had scarcely ever been beyond the sound of Bow Bells; and who were travelling post over the United States to make up a book of observation, on our manners and customs.
Page 342 - The temptation was too strong for the woodsman, and he resolved to have a shot at every hazard. Re-priming his gun, and picking his flint, he made his approaches in the usual noiseless manner. At the moment he reached the spot from which he meant to take his aim, he observed a large savage, intent upon the same object, advancing from a direction a little different from his own. Mike shrunk behind a tree, with the quickness of thought, and keeping his eye fixed on the hunter, waited the result with...
Page 341 - ... scout thought it as praiseworthy to bring in the scalp of a Shawnee, as the skin of a panther. He would remain in the woods for weeks together, using parched corn for bread, and depending on his rifle for his meat — and slept at night in perfect comfort, rolled in his blanket. In this corps, whilst yet a stripling, Mike acquired a reputation for boldness, and cunning, far beyond his companions. A thousand legends illustrate the fearlessness of his character. There was one, which he told, himself,...
Page 333 - He was leaning carelessly against a large beech ; and, as his left arm negligently pressed a rifle to his side, presented a figure that Salvator would have chosen from a million, as a model for his wild and gloomy pencil.

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