Lilith

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, May 19, 1981 - Fiction - 252 pages
5 Reviews
Introduction by C. S. Lewis

Lilith is equal if not superior to the best of Poe, wrote W. H. Auden in his introduction to the 1954 reprint of George MacDonald s Lilith, which was first published in 1895.

It is the story of Mr. Vane, an orphan and heir to a large house -- a house in which he has a vision that leads him through a large old mirror into another world. In chronicling the five trips Mr. Vane makes to this other world, MacDonald hauntingly explores the ultimate mystery of evil.
 

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Lilith

User Review  - zdzislaw - Overstock.com

This was a very interesting work of fantasy. I could definitely see the similarities between this author and C.S. Lewis. Fantasy novels such as this dont really exist anymore and it was nice to see ... Read full review

User Review  - Matthew - Christianbook.com

A few things to keep in mind before reading Lilith is: it is not for kids, it's a romance (or fairy tale) for adults, and it is a contemporary myth with spiritual and Christian truths. This profound ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

I
5
II
9
III
11
IV
17
V
24
VI
27
VII
32
VIII
38
XXV
125
XXVI
132
XXVII
136
XXVIII
139
XXIX
142
XXX
150
XXXI
154
XXXII
159

IX
42
X
47
XI
51
XII
55
XIII
59
XIV
67
XV
72
XVI
81
XVII
88
XVIII
95
XIX
103
XX
108
XXI
112
XXII
115
XXIII
119
XXIV
122
XXXIII
164
XXXIV
172
XXXV
177
XXXVI
182
XXXVII
186
XXXVIII
189
XXXIX
197
XL
208
XLI
220
XLII
224
XLIII
230
XLIV
237
XLV
243
XLVI
247
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 2 - I did not perceive that they were weaving or spinning Yet I did detect, when the wind lulled and hearing was done away, the finest imaginable sweet musical hum, — as of a distant hive in May, which perchance was the sound of their thinking...
Page 30 - Every one, as you ought to know, has a beast-self — and a bird-self, and a stupid fishself, aye, and a creeping serpent-self too — which it takes a deal of crushing to kill. In truth he has also a tree-self and a crystalself, and I don't know how many selves more — all to get into harmony. You can tell what sort a man is by his creature that comes oftenest to the front" He turned to his wife, and I considered him more closely.
Page 2 - I took a walk on Spaulding's Farm the other afternoon. I saw the setting sun lighting up the opposite side of a stately pine wood. Its golden rays straggled into the aisles of the wood as into some noble hall. I was impressed as if some ancient and altogether admirable and shining family had settled there in that part of the land called Concord, unknown to me— to whom the sun was servant— who had not gone into society in the village— who had not been called on.
Page xi - It did nothing to my intellect nor (at that time) to my conscience Their turn came far later and with the help of many other books and men But when the process was complete — by which, of course, I mean 'when it had really begun...
Page 19 - The sun broke through the clouds, and the raindrops flashed and sparkled on the grass. The raven was walking over it. "You will wet your feet," I cried. "And mire my beak," he answered, immediately plunging it deep in the sod, and drawing out a great wriggling red worm. He threw back his head, and tossed it in the air. It spread great wings, gorgeous in red and black, and soared aloft. "Tut! Tut!
Page xi - I knew that I had crossed a great frontier. I had already been waist deep in Romanticism; and likely enough, at any moment, to flounder into its darker and more evil forms, slithering down the steep descent that leads from the love of strangeness to that of eccentricity and thence to that of perversity.
Page 30 - Upon occasion," said the sexton at length, "it is more convenient to put one's bird-self in front. Every one, as you ought to know, has a beast-self — and a bird-self, and a stupid fishself, aye, and a creeping serpent-self too — which it takes a deal of crushing to kill. In truth he has also a tree-self and a crystalself, and I don't know how many selves more — all to get into harmony. You can tell what sort a man is by his creature that comes oftenest to the front...

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About the author (1981)

(1824-1905) The great nineteenth-century innovator of modern fantasy, whose works influenced C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams. "I do not write for children," MacDonald once said, "but for the childlike, whether of five, or fifty, or seventy-five.

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