Limb Regeneration

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 13, 1996 - Science - 241 pages
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The complex phenomenon of limb regeneration that occurs in some Amphibia involves unique molecular and cellular mechanisms. When a limb is amputated a new one is produced by the transformation of the remaining adult limb tissues into an embryonic-like cell mass, called the blastema. The blastema has the ability to subsequently redifferentiate into the various tissues that comprise a limb and therefore replace the lost part. Some scientists argue that the same processes that are encountered in normal embryogenesis are reinitiated during regeneration. This is the first book that describes and analyzes the mechanisms of both limb regeneration and patterning by incorporating the information obtained from older experiments with the many new advances in molecular and cellular biology that have occurred in recent years.
 

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Contents

Capacity of limb regeneration in vertebrates
7
The amputationthe early events
19
Dedifferentiation and origin of the blastema
32
Differentiation of the blastema
61
Protein synthesis in the blastema
81
Tissue versus epimorphic regeneration
94
Postembryonic induction in amphibian limbs
103
Genetics and limb regeneration
114
The regeneration of positional information
135
Vitamin A and patterning
154
Hox genes and limb regeneration
179
Regenerating versus developing limbs
188
Applications of modern techniques to the field
195
Epilogue
203
Index
237
Copyright

Morphogenetic properties of the blastema
125

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