Lindiana: An Interesting Narrative of the Life of Jenny Lind

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Mitchell & Son, 1847 - 52 pages
 

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Page 50 - On one occasion only did I hear her express her joy in her talent and her self-consciousness. It was during her last residence in Copenhagen. Almost every evening she appeared either in the opera or at concerts; every hour was in requisition. " She heard of a society, the object of which was, to assist unfortunate children, and to take them out of the hands...
Page 51 - I not still a disengaged evening ?' said she ; ' let me give a night's performance for the benefit of these poor children; but we will have double prices!' " Such a performance was given, and returned large proceeds; when she was informed of this, and, that, by this means, a number of poor children would be benefited for several years, her countenance beamed, and the tears filled her eyes. " ' It is however beautiful,' said she
Page 28 - ... omnipotent sway — the whole of Copenhagen was in raptures. Jenny Lind was the first singer to whom the Danish students gave a serenade : torches blazed...
Page 49 - Speak to her about her art, and you will wonder at the expansion of her mind, and will see her countenance beaming with inspiration. Converse then with her of God, and of the holiness of religion, and you will see tears in those innocent eyes ; she is great as an artist, but she is still greater in her pure human existence...
Page 51 - It is however beautiful," said she, " that I can sing so ! " I value her with the whole feeling of a brother, and I regard myself as happy that I know and understand such a spirit. God give to her that peace, that quiet happiness which she wishes for herself ! Through Jenny Lind I first became sensible of the holiness there is in art; through her I learned that one must forget oneself in the service of the Supreme. No books, no men have had a better or a more ennobling influence on me as the poet,...
Page 28 - Lind sang her Swedish songs ; there was something so peculiar in this, so bewitching; people thought nothing about the...
Page 50 - It was during her last residence in Copenhagen. Almost every evening she appeared either in the opera or at concerts; every hour was in requisition. She heard of a society, the object of which was, to assist unfortunate children, and to take them out of the hands of their parents by whom they were misused, and compelled either to beg or steal, and to place them in other and better circumstances. Benevolent people subscribed annually a small sum each for their support, nevertheless the means for this...
Page 27 - I have never made my appearance," said she, "Out of Sweden ; every body in my native land is so affectionate and kind to me, and if I made my appearance in Copenhagen and should be hissed ! — I dare not venture on it ! " I said, that I, it was true, could not pass judgment on her singing, because I had never heard it, neither did I know how she acted, but nevertheless I was convinced that such was the disposition at this moment in Copenhagen, that only a moderate voice and...
Page 47 - When, in her beautiful closes, she prolonged a tone, attenuated it by degrees, and falling gently upon the final note, the sound, though as ethereal as the sighing of a breeze, reached, like Mrs. Siddons's whisper in Lady Macbeth, every part of the immense theatre. Much of the effect of this...
Page 33 - Tickets must be applied for on the day preceding that for which they are required, by letter, signed with the applicant's proper and Christian name, profession, and place of abode, and sealed with wax, bearing the writer's initials with his arms. No more than one ticket can be granted to the same person; and no person is entitled to apply for two consecutive nights of the enchantress's performance.

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