Lionel Lincoln: Or, The Leaguer of Boston

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Stringer and Townsend, 1852 - Boston (Mass.)
 

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Page 40 - But woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye shut up the kingdom of heaven against men: for ye neither go in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are entering to go in. Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows' houses and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.
Page iv - IDE, of the said District, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " Inductive Grammar, designed for beginners. By an Instructer." In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 4 - District, has deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit : " THE CHILD'S BOTANY," In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, " An act for the encouragement of learning by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned...
Page iv - An Act supplementary to an act, entitled an act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and...
Page 5 - She speaks, yet she says nothing. What of that? Her eye discourses; I will answer it. I am too bold; 'tis not to me she speaks. Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
Page 88 - If any man can show just cause, why they may not lawfully be joined together, let him now speak, or else hereafter for ever hold his peace.
Page 270 - ... the disordered masses of the British were seen driven before their deliberate foes, in wild confusion. The flashing swords of the officers in vain attempted to arrest the torrent, nor did the flight cease, with many of the regiments, until they had even reached their boats. At this moment a hum was heard in Boston, like the sudden rush of wind, and men gazed in each other's faces with undisguised amazement. Here and there a low sound of exultation escaped some unguarded lip, and many an eye gleamed...
Page 226 - God's accountables, nor is he to be treated like other children," returned the woman. " Ah ! Major Lincoln, a healthier, and a stouter, and a finer boy was not to be seen in the Bay province, till the child had reached his fifth year ! then, then it was that the judgment of heaven fell on mother and son — sickness made him what you see, a being with the form, but without the reason of man, and I have grown the wretch I am. But it has all been foretold, and warnings enough have I had of it all !...
Page 268 - ... that lay profusely scattered in front of the redoubt. At this instant an officer from the field held an earnest communication with the two leaders, when, having delivered -his orders, he hastened back to his boat like one who felt himself employed in matters of life and death. " It shall be done, sir," repeated Clinton as the other departed, his own honest brow sternly knit under high martial excitement. " The artillery have their orders, and the work will be accomplished without delay.
Page 268 - ... uttered the fatal mandate to destroy. In scenes like these we are attempting to describe, hours appear to be minutes, and time flies as imperceptibly as life slides from beneath the feet of age. The disordered ranks of the British had been arrested at the base of the hill, and were again forming under the eyes of their leaders, with admirable discipline and extraordinary care. Fresh battalions, from Boston, marched with high military pride into the line, and everything betokened that a second...

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