Listen: A History of Our Ears

Front Cover
Fordham Univ Press, Aug 25, 2009 - Law - 156 pages
0 Reviews
In this intimate meditation on listening, Peter Szendy examines what the role of the listener is, and has been, through the centuries. The role of the composer is clear, as is the role of the musician, but where exactly does the listener stand in relation to the music s/he listens to? What is the responsibility of the listener? Does a listener have any rights, as the author and composer have copyright? Szendy explains his love of musical arrangement (since arrangements allow him to listen to someone listening to music), and wonders whether it is possible in other ways to convey to others how we ourselves listen to music. How can we share our actual hearing with others?Along the way, he examines the evolution of copyright laws as applied to musical works and takes us into the courtroom to examine different debates on what we are and aren't allowed to listen to, and to witness the fine line between musical borrowing and outright plagiarism. Finally, he examines the recent phenomenon of DJs and digital compilations, and wonders how technology has affected our habits of listening and has changed listening from a passive exercise to an active one, whereby one can jump from track to track or play only selected pieces.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Im Listening
1
Chapter 1 Authors Rights Listeners Rights Journal of Our Ancestors
13
Arrangement Translation Criticism
35
Chapter 3 Our Instruments for Listening Before the Law Second Journal Entry
69
The Making of the Modern Ear
99
Plastic Listening
129
Notes
145
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Peter Szendy teaches aesthetics in the Philosophy Department of the University of Nanterre. He is also adviser for the Cit de la musique in Paris. In English, he has recently published Listen: A History of Our Ears and Prophecies of Leviathan: Reading Past Melville (both Fordham). Jean-Luc Nancy is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the Universit Marc Bloch, Strasbourg. Among the most recent of his many books to be published in English are Corpus; The Ground of the Image; Listening; Dis-Enclosure: The Deconstruction of Christianity; Noli me tangere: On the Raising of the Body; On the Commerce of Thinking: Of Books and Bookstores; and The Truth of Democracy (all Fordham). CHARLOTTE MANDELL has translated over twenty books, including several books for Fordham: Peter Szendy's Listen: A History of Our Ears and Jean-Luc Nancy's Listening. Her most recent translation is The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell.

Bibliographic information