Literacy and Popular Culture: Using Children's Culture in the Classroom

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SAGE, 2000 - Education - 216 pages
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Most children engage with a range of popular cultural forms outside of school. Their experiences with film, television, computer games and other cultural texts are very motivating, but often find no place within the official curriculum, where children are usually restricted to conventional forms of literacy.

This book demonstrates how to use children's interests in popular culture to develop literacy in the primary classroom. The authors provide a theoretical basis for such work through an exploration of related theory and research, drawing from the fields of education, sociology and cultural studies.

Teachers are often concerned about issues of sexism, racism, violence and commercialism within the disco

 

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Contents

Challenging racism sexism violence and consumerism
23
Play and popular culture
44
Environmental print
61
Encouraging the reading habit
83
Comics 11
101
Computer games
118
Television and film
138
Popular music and literacy
163
Conclusion
182
Index
211
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References to this book

The Excellence of Play
Janet R. Moyles
No preview available - 2005
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About the author (2000)

Jackie Marsh is Professor of Education at the University of Sheffield, UK, where she conducts research on young children's play and digital literacy practices in homes, communities and early years settings and primary schools. Her most recent publications include Changing Play: Play, Media and Commercial Culture from the 1950s to the Present Day (with Bishop, 2014) and Handbook of Early Childhood Literacy (edited with Larson, 2013). Jackie is an editor of the Journal of Early Childhood Literacy.

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