Literary Trivia: Fun and Games for Book Lovers

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Vintage Books, 1994 - Games - 233 pages
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From the author of Crazy English and The Miracle of Language, a fiendishly engrossing, thoroughly addictive volume of anecdotes, curiosities, and quizzes testing your knowledge of books from Genesis to One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest..

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Contents

authorial anecdotes
3
moonlighting for sixpence
9
penultimate names
19
notsoprivate lives
25
super sleuths
34
the final chapter
43
Titles
51
THE BESTIARY
59
WAR GAME
122
BOOKS IN THE NEWS
129
LITERARY MISCONCEPTIONS
135
The Bible
145
BIBLE RIDDLES
153
GOOD WORDS FROM THE GOOD BOOK
160
THE BIBLE IN THE NEWS I
167
TEST YOUR MYTHOLOGY IQ
177

PLAYING THE NUMBERS GAME
66
THE GAME IS THE NAME
74
THIS AND THAT
85
OR WHAT YOU WILL
97
TRY THESE FOR OPENERS
103
WORLD SERIES
110
NOTABLE QUOTABLE POETRY
116
MYTHOLOGY IN THE NEWS
185
Shakespeare
191
A MAN OF MANY TITLES
199
SHAKESPEARE IN THE NEWS
205
INDEX
211
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Richard Lederer, the well-known wordsmith, originally intended to practice medicine. He entered Haverford College as a pre-medical student, but when he realized that he was more interested in the textbooks' language than their substance, he switched his major to English. He next attended Harvard Law School, but again switched majors--this time entering Harvard's Master of Arts and Teaching program. After graduation, he taught English and media at St. Paul's School, in Concord, N.H., for 27 years. Upon earning his Ph.D. in English and Linguistics from the University of New Hampshire, he decided to pursue a career writing books on the English language. His first book, Anguished English, was a popular success and launched his career. His books, newspaper columns, and speaking engagements have allowed Lederer, in his own words, "to extend my mission of teachership." Lederer describes himself as a "verbivore" - one who consumes words. He says, "Carnivores eat meat; herbivores eat plants and vegetables; verbivores devour words." His fascination with word play (particularly, palindromes and puns) resulted in his nicknames--"Attila the Pun" and "Conan the Grammarian.

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