Little Lord Fauntleroy

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Charles Scribner's Sons, 1886 - Altruism - 269 pages
12 Reviews
An American boy goes to live with his grandfather in England where he becomes heir to a title, estate and fortune.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vonze - LibraryThing

Little Lord Fauntleroy is a sweet tale about a father-less, American boy named Cedric who finds himself the heir to an English earldom. The story is sorta in the vein of other classic books, like Anne ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AbigailAdams26 - LibraryThing

I am always at something of a loss to explain my abiding love for Little Lord Fauntleroy, which must be included, along with The Secret Garden and A Little Princess, among the author's better known ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
40
IV
49
V
64
VI
87
VII
112
VIII
121
IX
134
X
141
XI
163
XII
175
XIII
187
XIV
193
XV
200

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Page 73 - Ha!" ejaculated his lordship. "That's it, is it? The money you were to spend as you liked. What did you buy with it? I should like to hear something about that.
Page 134 - He began to take pleasure in showing his heir to the world. The world had known of his disappointment in his sons; so there was an agreeable touch of triumph in exhibiting this new Lord Fauntleroy, who could disappoint no one. He wished the child to appreciate his own power and to understand the splendor of his position; he wished that others should realize it too. He made plans for his future. Sometimes in secret he actually found himself wishing that his own past life had been a better one, and...
Page 14 - but just when Mary came for me, you know?" Mr. Hobbs rubbed the back of his head. "We was mentioning Queen Victoria and the aristocracy." "Yes," said Cedric, rather hesitatingly, "and — and earls; don't you know?" "Why, yes," returned Mr. Hobbs; "we did touch 'em up a little; that's so!" Cedric flushed up to the curly bang on his forehead. Nothing so embarrassing as this had ever happened to him in his life. He was a little afraid that it might be a trifle embarrassing to Mr. Hobbs, too. "You said,"...
Page 75 - The sensations of the Right. Honorable the Earl of Dorincourt could scarcely be described. He was not an old nobleman who was very easily bewildered, because he had seen a great deal of the world; but here was something he found so novel that it almost took his lordly breath away, and caused him some singular emotions. He had never cared for children; he had been so occupied with his own pleasures that he had never had time to care for them. His...

About the author (1886)

Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote for children and adults, publishing both plays and novels. She was born in Manchester, England, on November 24, 1849. Her father, who owned a furniture store, died when she was only four years old. Her mother struggled to keep the family business running while trying to raise five children. Finally, because of the failing Manchester economy, the family sold the store and immigrated to the United States. In 1865 they settled just outside of Knoxville, Tennessee. Hoping to offset her family's continuing financial troubles, Burnett began to submit her stories to women's magazines. She was immediately successful. In the late 1860s her stories were published in nearly every popular American magazine. Burnett helped to support her family with income from the sale of her stories, even saving enough to finance a trip back to England, where she stayed for over a year. In 1879, Burnett published her first stories for children; two of her most popular are A Little Princess and The Secret Garden. In contrast to an extremely successful career, Burnett's personal life held many challenges. Her son Lionel was diagnosed with tuberculosis at age 15, from which he never recovered. His death inspired several stories about dead or dying children. Burnett lived her later years on Long Island, New York. She died in 1924.

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