Little Men

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Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2010 - Fiction - 308 pages
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Little Men, by Louisa May Alcott, is the second book in the Little Women trilogy. Also titled Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys, the book follows Jo Bhaer and her husband Professor Bhaer as they run the Plumfield Estate School, taking under their wing young boys and girls in need of instruction and love. As in Little Women, each student has his or her own faults that make it all the more difficult to mature into proper young ladies and gentlemen. And, as in Little Women, the children must confront those difficulties and fears head-on before truly learning their lesson. In 1868, Alcott's Little Women launched the success of the March family saga along with the success of Alcott the writer, which lives on into our own time. Little Men focuses on Jo and her family, likely because Alcott modeled Jo after herself and always felt closest to the character. Readers fell in love with the most outgoing March sister as well, and their devotion continued through the exploits of her sons and students in the final two books in this captivating trilogy. LOUISA MAY ALCOTT (1832-1888), one of the most well-known American novelists of the 19th century, was born on November 29, 1832 to transcendentalist educator Amos Bronson Alcott and his wife, Abigail May Alcott. She was the second of four sisters (like Jo, her literary corollary), and grew up in a family that encouraged and sympathized with her abolitionist and feminist leanings. As a child she received instruction from noted literary figures such as Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Nathaniel Hawthorne, all family friends. In addition to the Little Women series, which included four novels, she wrote 28 other works, three under the pen name A.M Barnard. Though Alcott had chronic health problems in her later years, most likely attributed to an autoimmune disease, she continued to write until her death at 55 in 1888.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
23
IV
41
V
52
VI
70
VII
89
VIII
99
XII
152
XIII
174
XIV
182
XV
202
XVI
219
XVII
229
XVIII
242
XIX
252

IX
110
X
122
XI
138
XX
265
XXI
285
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Louisa May Alcott was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Two years later, she moved with her family to Boston and in 1840 to Concord, which was to remain her family home for the rest of her life. Her father, Bronson Alcott, was a transcendentalist and friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. Alcott early realized that her father could not be counted on as sole support of his family, and so she sacrificed much of her own pleasure to earn money by sewing, teaching, and churning out potboilers. Her reputation was established with Hospital Sketches (1863), which was an account of her work as a volunteer nurse in Washington, D.C. Alcott's first works were written for children, including her best-known Little Women (1868--69) and Little Men: Life at Plumfield with Jo's Boys (1871). Moods (1864), a "passionate conflict," was written for adults. Alcott's writing eventually became the family's main source of income. Throughout her life, Alcott continued to produce highly popular and idealistic literature for children. An Old-Fashioned Girl (1870), Eight Cousins (1875), Rose in Bloom (1876), Under the Lilacs (1878), and Jack and Jill (1881) enjoyed wide popularity. At the same time, her adult fiction, such as the autobiographical novel Work: A Story of Experience (1873) and A Modern Mephistopheles (1877), a story based on the Faust legend, shows her deeper concern with such social issues as education, prison reform, and women's suffrage. She realistically depicts the problems of adolescents and working women, the difficulties of relationships between men and women, and the values of the single woman's life.

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