Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal of England, from the Earliest Times Till the Reign of King George IV.

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Page 316 - MEN in great place are thrice servants ; servants of the sovereign or state, servants of fame, and servants of business ; so as they have no freedom, neither in their persons, nor in their actions, nor in their timea. It is a strange desire to seek power and to lose liberty ; or to seek power over others, and to lose power over a man's self.
Page 355 - But farther, it is an assured truth, and a conclusion of experience, that a little or superficial knowledge of philosophy may incline the mind of man to atheism, but a farther proceeding therein doth bring the mind back again to religion ; for in the entrance of philosophy, when the second causes, which are next unto the senses, do offer themselves to the mind of man, if it dwell and stay there, it may induce some oblivion of the highest cause...
Page 325 - I hope I shall not be found to have the troubled fountain of a corrupt heart, in a depraved habit of taking rewards to pervert justice ; howsoever I may be frail, and partake of the abuses of the times.
Page 243 - I confess that I have as vast contemplative ends, as I have moderate civil ends...
Page 255 - You may observe that amongst all the great and worthy persons (whereof the memory remaineth, either ancient or recent) there is not one that hath been transported to the mad degree of love: which shows that great spirits and great business do keep out this weak passion.
Page 238 - This kind of degenerate learning did chiefly reign amongst the schoolmen, who, having sharp and strong wits, and abundance of leisure, and small variety of reading ; but their wits being shut up in the cells of a few authors, chiefly Aristotle their dictator, as their persons were shut up in the cells of monasteries and colleges, and knowing little history, either of nature or time, did, out of no great quantity of matter, and infinite agitation of wit, spin out unto us those laborious webs of learning,...
Page 325 - Columbse" from others, now I bring it from myself. I fly unto your majesty with the wings of a dove, which, once within these seven days, I thought, would have carried me a higher flight. When I enter into myself, I find not the materials of such a tempest as is come upon me. I have been (as your majesty knoweth best) never author of any immoderate counsel, but always desired to have things carried
Page 161 - Wherefore, Mr. Speaker, her Majesty's Pleasure is, that if you perceive any idle heads, which will not stick to hazard their own Estates ; which will meddle with reforming the Church, and transforming the Commonwealth ; and do exhibit any Bills to such purpose, that you receive them not, until they be viewed and considered by those, who, it is fitter should consider of such things, and can better judge of them.
Page 258 - ... and other such strange light terms he gave me, with that insulting which cannot be expressed. Herewith stirred, yet I said no more but this : " Mr. Attorney, do not depress me so far ; for I have been your better, and may be again, when it please the Queen.
Page 491 - It was true, we gave laws to hares and deer, because they are beasts of chase : but it was never accounted either cruelty or foul play to knock foxes or wolves on the head as they can be found, because they are beasts of prey.

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