Living on Wilderness Time

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University of Virginia Press, Mar 6, 2015 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages

Melissa Walker set out on a journey that many women of her generation have mapped only in their dreams. Like many American chroniclers before her who have surrendered to the aimless pleasures of the road, Walker had no geographical destination in mind, but she did have two definite goals—one personal, one political—for her journey. She was looking for the peace and solitude of the backcountry, certainly, but she also wanted to learn the dynamics of preserving wild places and to devote herself to that cause. In the Sky Islands of southern Arizona, on the banks of the Popo Agie River and the Wind River Mountains in Wyoming, in Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Rocky Mountain, and Olympic National Park, in Gila and Glacier Peak Wilderness, she encountered the hazards of wild animals and extreme weather, and she began to reassess what parts of her life she could control.

Living on Wilderness Time is a book for those who have visited wild places and want to return, and for others whose overcommitted urban lives make them long for land where time is measured differently and human beings are scarce. Above all it is a call to join those who, like Aldo Leopold, see wilderness as vital to the human community.

Melissa Walker is vice president of National Wilderness Watch, chair of the Georgia chapter of Wilderness Watch, serves on the Southern Appalachian Council of the Wilderness Society, and is the author of Reading the Environment and Down from the Mountaintop. She has been Professor of English at the University of New Orleans and Mercer University and a fellow of Women’s Studies at Emory University. Walker lives with her husband in Atlanta, Georgia.

 

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Contents

Hurry Sickness
3
Home
14
Rock Springs
20
FROM HOME TO WILDERNESS
31
Copyright

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Page 18 - ... road winding through acres and acres of pines. Home is a stand of blooming peach trees in the spring and a pecan orchard raining nuts all over the ground in the fall. It's a towering oak tree I planted as a seedling and the antique rose that's the last remnant of my grandmother's once carefully tended garden. Home is the way the trees grow, the land lays, and the scent of a skunk or honeysuckle lingers in still air.
Page 11 - ... white wilderness." A wasteland, as an area unused or useless for agriculture or pasture. A space of sea or air, as in Shakespeare, "I stand as one upon a Rock, environ'd with a Wilderness of Sea" (Titus Andronicus). The oceans. A place of danger and difficulty: where you take your own chances, depend on your own skills, and do not count on rescue. This world as contrasted with heaven. "I walked through the wildernesse of this world" (Pilgrim's Progress). A place of abundance, as in John Milton,...
Page 14 - Home ~~^; ALMOST EVERYTHING I remember about childhood took place in a small town in south Georgia. Much of what I remember happening inside houses is tinged with anxiety or boredom, but as soon as I place myself in the...

About the author (2015)

Melissa Walker is vice president of National Wilderness Watch, chair of the Georgia chapter of Wilderness Watch, serves on the Southern Appalachian Council of the Wilderness Society, and is the author of Reading the Environment and Down from the Mountaintop. She has been Professor of English at the University of New Orleans and Mercer University and a fellow of Women's Studies at Emory University. Walker lives with her husband in Decatur, Georgia.

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