Living with Paradox: Religious Leadership and the Genius of Double Vision

Front Cover
Wiley, May 8, 1998 - Religion - 144 pages
0 Reviews
Individuals who are in religious leadership positions will immediately recognize the dilemmas or paradoxes described in this book. The good news is that Malony offers sound practical advice on how to deal with them. This book is accurately descriptive and helpfully prescriptive.
--Douglas Lewis, Wesley Theological Seminary

Malony suggests ways to turn destructive conflict into creative tension. A helpful guide for every religious leader struggling to make sense out of the colliding interests that buffet many congregations and other not-for-profit institutions.
--William E. Hull, Samford University

As a leader you must also challenge individuals to make uncomfortable choices in the service of doing God's work in the world.

Maloney identifies eight central paradoxes that all religious leaders--both lay and ordained--must confront. The author shows how these paradoxes, when viewed as either/or choices or struggled against, can whipsaw the leader, tearing the ministry apart. However, embracing paradox and accepting it as a gift allows religious leaders to deal successfully with conflict in their roles, and in so doing, break through to a more powerful connection with those to whom they minister.

H. Newton Malony is senior professor of psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary, a licensed psychologist, and an ordained United Methodist minister.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Being True to Oneself and
17
Playing Three Roles
31
Paradoxes of Perspective
45
Applying the Bibles Eternal
59
Balancing the Books
75
Paradoxes of Congregational Mission
105
Leading Others to Double Vision
129
References
137
Copyright

About the author (1998)

NEWTON MALONY is senior professor of psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary, a licensed psychologist, and an ordained United Methodist minister. He earned his Masters of Divinity degree at Yale Divinity School, and he received his Ph.D. degree from George Peobody College at Vanderbilt University. Malony has written numerous books on psychology and religion, including Win-Win Relationships and the Psychology of Religion for Ministry. He and his wife live in Pasadena, California.

Bibliographic information