Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age

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M.E. Sharpe, Jan 10, 1997 - History
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The development and use of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki number among the formative national experiences for both Japanese and Americans, as well as for U.S.-Japan relations throughout the last half of the twentieth century. It is now clear, however, that memories and lessons learned from the bombings are still being reworked and contested, perhaps even more heatedly than they were in 1945. Tracking the development of that fifty-year trajectory, this volume explores the ways in which the bomb has shaped the self-image of both peoples: for Americans, the dominant story is that the bombs provided an appropriate and necessary conclusion to a just war; for Japanese, it is a symbol of their victimization. The distinguished contributors analyze the ways in which memories of the bombs, constantly reworked in the media, in the arts, and in the political arena, continue to define important, albeit often unacknowledged, undercurrents in the U.S.-Japan relationship. The dialogue in this book is attentive to both Japanese and American voices and puts into historical, intellectual, cultural, and moral context the powerful legacy of an event whose different meanings remain alive, contentious, and in flux.
 

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Contents

II
3
III
37
IV
52
V
73
VI
100
VII
122
VIII
134
IX
155
X
173
XI
202
XII
232
XIII
260
XIV
279
XV
287
XVI
291
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Page 6 - Moreover, the enemy has begun to employ a new and most cruel bomb, the power of which to do damage is, indeed, incalculable, taking the toll of many innocent lives.
Page 6 - Indeed, We declared war on America and Britain out of Our sincere desire to ensure Japan's self-preservation and the stabilization of East Asia, it being far from Our thought either to infringe upon the sovereignty of other nations or to embark upon territorial aggrandizement.

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