Localising Salafism: Religious Change Among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia

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BRILL, Sep 30, 2011 - Social Science - 380 pages
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The political transition in 1991 and the new regime s policy towards the ethnic and religious diversity in Ethiopia have contributed to increased activities from various Islamic reform movements. Among these, we find the Salafi movement which expanded rapidly throughout the 1990s, particularly in the Oromo-speaking south-eastern parts of the country. This book sheds light on the emergence and expansion of Salafism in Bale. Focusing on the diversified body of situated actors and their role in the process of religious change, it discusses the early arrival of Salafism in the late 1960s, follows it through the Marxist period (1974-1991) before discussing the rapid expansion of the movement in the 1990s. The movement s dynamics and the controversies emerging as a result of the reforms are discussed, particularly with reference to different understandings of sources for religious knowledge and the role of Islamic literacy.
 

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Contents

Chapter One Introduction
1
Chapter Two Salafism Localisation and Religious Change
13
Chapter Three The Islamisation of Southeast Ethiopia and Bale
43
Chapter Four The Religious Universe of the Oromo in Bale
83
Chapter Five The Emergence of Salafism in Bale
125
Chapter Six Responding to Salafism
157
Chapter Seven The Derg and Processes of Change
195
Chapter Eight Democratisation and Dawa
237
Chapter Nine Salafism Politics and Ethnicity
275
Chapter Ten Concluding Discussion
311
Glossary
331
List of Informants
335
References
341
Index
363
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About the author (2011)

Terje steb, Ph.D. (2009) in History of Religion, Stockholm University, is Assistant Professor at the Center for African Studies & Department of Religion, University of Florida. He has published extensively on Islam in Ethiopia and in the Horn of Africa.

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