Log Cabins and Cottages: How to Build and Furnish Them

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Forest and Stream Publishing Company, 1908 - Cottages - 47 pages
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drawings of houses in back

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Page 9 - ... it shall be a new object added by the hand of man to perfect and beautify its surroundings ; and the whole when viewed shall produce an agreeable effect, like harmony in music and rhythm in poetry. Hence the difficulties attending the choice of a building plan. As every man needs to be measured to get a perfectly fitting garment, so every building site needs to be considered to get a perfectly suitable cabin.
Page 9 - ... to the narrow limits of towns, aesthetic feeling went back once more to the naive anthropinism of an earlier age : but since the Renaissance, the love of scenery has grown perpetually, and it now probably reaches the furthest development that it has ever yet attained. But we must never forget that the taste for scenery on a large scale is confined to comparatively few races, and comparatively few persons amongst them.
Page 20 - After drying, the bark may be cut and used in the same general manner as shingles, or, as is more common, it may be laid in strips about four feet long and as wide as the circumference of the tree from which it is taken. When a roof is laid of these long pieces, the bearing poles are laid horizontally and about two feet apart; the bark is then laid cross-wise with a lap of six inches (Fig.
Page 9 - These and similar considerations must guide you in locating your camp. Having selected your site, the next thing is to study it. Mark well its commanding and beautiful views, its back-ground, the fore-ground. Study it as you would a painting, for out of your site and its environment must grow your building plan. Indeed, the structure should be the outgrowth of, and harmonize with the site...
Page 12 - The bark will peal from the trees in the Adirondacks from the first of May until the last of July, or even later if the season is damp, but comes off most readily in the month of June. If you want the bark left on the logs, the late fall or winter months should be selected for cutting time.
Page 9 - ... it is only within the last two hundred years that man has learned to...
Page 15 - ... the openings by cutting the logs below the one already sawed out. This may be accomplished in the most satisfactory way by two men using a cross-cut saw. The openings being made, they will give you much more freedom to work in and about the building. The door and window frames should be ready to...
Page 24 - Use unmatched, planed or not planed boards, and nail a vertical piece or batten about two inches wide and one inch thick over the joint (Fig.
Page 8 - One essential of a log cabin or cottage and its furniture is, that as far aŠ possible they should be made on the spot and with the material at hand.

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