Logicism, Intuitionism, and Formalism: What Has Become of Them?

Front Cover
Sten Lindström, Erik Palmgren, Krister Segerberg, Viggo Stoltenberg-Hansen
Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 25, 2008 - Mathematics - 512 pages
1 Review

This anthology reviews the programmes in the foundations of mathematics from the classical period and assesses their possible relevance for contemporary philosophy of mathematics. A special section is concerned with constructive mathematics.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
26
III
27
IV
47
V
69
VI
91
VII
128
VIII
129
XIV
237
XV
255
XVI
277
XVII
302
XVIII
303
XIX
357
XX
397
XXI
434

IX
153
X
167
XI
189
XII
209
XIII
221
XXII
449
XXIII
485
XXIV
505
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Sten Lindström is Professor of Philosophy at Umeå University and has been a Research Fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS). He has published papers on intensional logic, belief revision and philosophy of language, and co-edited the books Logic, Action and Cognition: Essays in Philosophical Logic (Kluwer, 1997) and Collected Papers of Stig Kanger with Essays on his Life and Work, I-II (Kluwer, 2001).

Erik Palmgren is Professor of Mathematics at Uppsala University. His research interests are mainly mathematical logic and the foundations of mathematics. He is presently working on the foundational programme of replacing impredicative constructions by inductive constructions in mathematics, with special emphasis on point-free topology and topos theory.

Krister Segerberg is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at Uppsala University and the University of Auckland. He is the author of papers in modal logic, the logic of action, belief revision and deontic logic, as well as the books An Essay in Classical Modal Logic (1971) and Classical Propositional Operators: An Exercise in the Foundations of Logic (1982).

Viggo Stoltenberg-Hansen is professor of Mathematical Logic at Uppsala University. His main interests include computability and constructivity in mathematics.

Bibliographic information