London: A Pilgrimage

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Anthem Press, 2005 - History - 223 pages
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'London: A Pilgrimage' was conceived in 1868 by the journalist and playwright Blanchard Jerrold. Accompanied by the famous artist Gustave Dore, Jerrold prowled every corner of the heaving metropolis, sometimes with plain-clothes police for protection. 'London: A Pilgrimage' is a forgotten classic of social journalism, a frank and brutal look at the poverty striken, gin-swilling London of the nineteenth century, written in a perceptive, bold and gripping style.

180 incredible etchings by Dore escort Jerrold on his odyssey through the pulsating city, into the Lambeth gas works, seedy opium dens and grubby bathing houses; peering curiously into the desperate lives of the flower sellers, lavender girls and organ grinders. 'London: A Pilgrimage' is an enlightening work that brings to life the chaotic and gloomy past of a great city on the cusp of modern times.

Peter Ackroyd's excellent introduction sheds further light on the period and the context in which Jerrold and Dore felt compelled to reveal to the world the squalor into which London was slowly sinking.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
London Bridge
9
The Busy Riverside
17
The Docks
27
Above Bridge to Westminster
35
A11 London at A Boat Race
49
The Race
61
The Derby
67
London Under Green Leaves
114
With the Beasts
121
WorkADay London
128
Humble Industries
140
The Town of Malt
151
Under Lock and Key
157
Whitechapel and Thereabouts
166
In The Market Places
178

London on the Downs
78
The West End
88
In the Season
96
By the Abbey
105
London at Play
191
London Charity
212
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Blanchard Jerrold (1826–1884) was both journalist and playwright, withCool as a Cucumberbeing the most successful of his plays. He was also editor ofLloyd's Weekly Newsand closely associated with Charles Dickens, even working as one of the contributors for Dickens' weekly periodicalHousehold Words.   Gustave Doré (1832–1883) was an amazingly gifted artist, who was known for the intensity of his engravings and was even called 'the last of the Romantics'. Among his many works are illustrated editions ofParadise Lost,The BibleandThe Idylls of the Kings.   Peter Ackroyd is a successful and respected author and historian with a great interest in the city of London. His many publications includeLondon: The Biography(Chatto & Windus, 2000) andThe Lambs of London(Chatto & Windus, 2004). He has also written imaginatively convincing biographies of literary greats like TS Eliot, Charles Dickens, William Blake and Thomas More.

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