Long-Term Care: Diverse, Growing Population Includes Millions of Americans of All Ages

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 1996 - 24 pages
0 Reviews
Provides estimates of the current & future number of people needing long-term care. Included in these estimates are those currently receiving family care or paid services, as well as those who do not. The objectives are to estimate the prevalence of current long-term care need; report on the future prevalence of need, including factors that may influence it; & describe the diversity of needs among different groups. Charts & tables.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 10 - ... the onset of illness. They predict that declining death rates may actually increase the need for long-term care if more people live to develop age-related disabling conditions or live longer with existing disabilities. Others argue that disability is becoming increasingly compressed into a shorter portion of the lifespan, decreasing the number of years long-term care is needed. Improved treatments or prevention of common disabling conditions among the elderly, such as strokes and arthritis, could...
Page 8 - In the future, long-term care need will grow, but predicting the magnitude and composition of that growth is complicated by several factors. Experts agree that population aging will increase the number of disabled elderly needing long-term care over the next several decades, but no consensus exists on the size of that increase. In addition, estimates of future long-term care need among the nonelderly disabled are difficult to project. Finally, several factors, such as medical advances or changes...
Page 7 - Chicago, and from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the Department of Health and Human Services to the Institute for Research on Poverty of the University of Wisconsin.
Page 4 - ... climbing stairs; 3. had difficulty with one or more activities of daily living (ADLs), which include getting around inside the home, getting in and out of bed or a chair, bathing, dressing, eating or toileting; 4. had difficulty with one or more instrumental activities of daily living (lADLs), which include going outside the home, keeping track of money or bills, preparing meals, doing light housework or using the telephone; 5. was identified as having a developmental disability or a mental or...
Page 20 - Director of the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California. San Francisco (UCSF) since 1972.
Page 19 - ASPE used data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), conducted by the Bureau of the Census...
Page 2 - The aging of the baby boom generation means that long-term care needs will increase well into the next century, as much as doubling among the elderly population in the next 25 years. Meaningful projections of the nation's future long-term care needs, however, are clouded by uncertainty about whether baby boomers will live longer, healthier lives than preceding generations and by a lack of reliable estimates on the future size of the nonelderly disabled population.
Page 21 - ... institutionalized adults with mental illness by using unpublished data from the 1990 Inventory of Mental Health Organizations. These data were supplied by the federal Center for Mental Health Services and include adults aged 18 to 64 who have severe mental illness. The institutions inventoried include state and county mental hospitals, private psychiatric hospitals, Department of Veterans Affairs psychiatric organizations, residential treatment centers, multiservice mental health organizations,...
Page 5 - ... programs. Most people who need long-term care do not live in institutions. Of the more than 12 million Americans estimated to need long-term care assistance, only about 2.4 million live in institutions, such as nursing homes, chronic care hospitals, or other facilities. (See table 1.) The remaining 10 million individuals live at home or in small community residential settings, such as group homes or supervised apartments. Sources: Based on information from the US Department of Health and Human...
Page 3 - care" and think of themselves as "consumers" rather than "clients" or "care recipients." They prefer a more active role for themselves in their use of services. and their environment. Long-term care assistance can range from helping a...

Bibliographic information