Long-Term Care: Current Issues and Future Directions

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DIANE Publishing, 1996 - 33 pages
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Addresses what is meant by long-term careÓ, the conditions that give rise to long-term care need, & how such need is measured; which groups need long-term care; what long-term costs are for the federal & state governments as well as for families; what strategies some states & other countries are pursuing to contain public long-term care costs; & what experts predict about the future demand for long-term care. Charts & tables.
 

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Page 22 - the contents of this report earlier, we plan no further distribution until 30 days after its issue date. At that time, we will send copies of this report to other
Page 5 - Living Generally include eating, bathing, dressing, getting to and using the bathroom, getting in or out of a bed or chair, and mobility. Generally include going outside the home, keeping track of money or bills, preparing meals, doing light housework, using the telephone, and taking medicine.
Page 22 - will send copies of this report to other congressional committees and members with an interest in this matter; the Secretary of Health and Human Services; the Assistant Secretary for Aging; the Administrator, Health Care Financing Administration; the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; and
Page 8 - Based on our analysis of information from HHS and the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California. San Francisco
Page 16 - the option of applying for Medicaid waivers to fund home and community-based services for people who meet Medicaid eligibility requirements and would otherwise require expensive institutional care. All states now provide some
Page 7 - Elderly Note Includes people needing long-term care in institutions or in the community Children are those under 18 years old, working-age adults are those 18 to 64 years old. and the elderly are those 65 years old and older Source: Based on our analysis of information from HHS and the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco
Page 10 - Rehabilitation services, attendant and personal care, centers for independent living State: State Social Services or Human Resources Agency; other state agencies may administer part of Title XX funds for certain groups; for example, State Agency on Aging
Page 4 - Provides relief to the primary caregiver of a chronically ill or disabled beneficiary. By providing services in the beneficiary's or provider's home or in other settings, respite care allows the primary caregiver to be absent for a time. Homemaker Assists beneficiaries with general household activities and may include cleaning, laundry, meal planning, grocery shopping, meal preparation, transportation to medical services, and bill paying.
Page 20 - grow, but predicting the magnitude and composition ofthat growth is complicated by several factors. Experts agree that population aging will increase the number of disabled elderly needing long-term care
Page 7 - and the Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California, San Francisco We

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