Longitude and Empire: How Captain Cook's Voyages Changed the World

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UBC Press, Oct 1, 2010 - History - 256 pages

Before Captain Cook's three voyages, to Europeans the globe was uncertain and dangerous; after, it was comprehensible and ordered. Written as a conceptual field guide to the voyages, Longitude and Empire offers a significant rereading of both the expeditions and modern political philosophy. More than any other work, printed accounts of the voyages marked the shift from early modern to modern ways of looking at the world. The globe was no longer divided between Europeans and savages but populated instead by an almost overwhelming variety of national identities.

Cook's voyages took the fragmented and obscure global descriptions available at the time and consolidated them into a single, comprehensive textual vision. Locations became fixed on the map and the people, animals, plants, and artifacts associated with them were identified, collected, understood, and assimilated into a world order. This fascinating account offers a new understanding of Captain Cook's voyages and how they affected the European world view.

 

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Contents

States
4
Points
20
Shapes
46
Nations
78
Collections
136
Empires
168
Conclusions
198
Bibliography
214
Index
223
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Brian W. Richardson is a librarian at Windward Community College in Hawaii and is editing a collection of Hawaiian myths and legends.

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