Lord of the Flies

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Faber & Faber, 2005 - Airplane crash survival - 216 pages
3 Reviews
A plane crashes on a desert island and the only survivors, a group of schoolboys, assemble on the beach and wait to be rescued. As the boys' delicate sense of order fades, so their childish fears are transformed into something more primitive...

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Kind of Boring...

User Review  - Pomeraniansarebeast - Target

I recently read this book for a school project and thought it was kind of boring. On the other hand though, if you like adventure, surviving the wild and life or death scenarios I would definetly ... Read full review

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This book is completely, utterly exotic. I have never read such a book -one that would send a shiver up my spine -and one that would also move me close to tears. This is the best book I have ever read in years. The 'savage significance' mentioned in the review was quite impulsive, and it took over the humane behavior of the schoolboys, which was the part where I was a bit freaked out. It was amazingly terrifying how these boys could stand to like make their friend the 'pig' and then make him go on all fours, hitting and chasing him with spears. The really moving part was when they were discovered on the island, and suddenly the other boys' conscience knocked on their doorsteps and Ralph broke down and cried. He must've gone a little nuts. I would have. Imagine being chased by your schoolmates who were acting like absolute barbarians, killing each other and torturing each other with spears and knives.
To "Piggy": RIP. :D
 

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About the author (2005)

William Golding was born in Cornwall, England on September 19, 1911. Although educated to be a scientist at the request of his father, he developed an interest in literature. At Oxford University, he studied natural science for two years and then transferred to a program for English literature and philosophy. He eventually became a schoolmaster at Bishop Wordsworth's School in Salisbury. During World War II, he joined the Royal Navy and was involved in the sinking of the German battleship Bismarck. After the war, he returned to Bishop Wordsworth's School and taught there until 1962. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published in 1954 and was made into a film in 1963. His other novels include The Inheritors, Free Fall, The Spire, The Pyramid, The Paper Men, Close Quarters, and Fire down Below. He won the Booker Prize for Rites of Passage in 1980 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983. He also wrote plays, essays, and short stories. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1988. He died on June 19, 1993.

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