Lord of the Flies

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Faber & Faber, 2005 - Airplane crash survival - 216 pages
3097 Reviews
A plane crashes on a desert island and the only survivors, a group of schoolboys, assemble on the beach and wait to be rescued. As the boys' delicate sense of order fades, so their childish fears are transformed into something more primitive...

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User Review  - bookwyrmm - LibraryThing

Lots of symbolism, but there was a missed opportunity for Piggy (the only character I cared about) to have achieved an even higher level of symbolism. Read full review

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User Review  - LindaLiu - LibraryThing

Set during the second world war. A plane goes down on a remote island and the only survivors are a group of schoolboys aged from the very young to the late teens. Piggy and Ralph organise the boys for ... Read full review

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About the author (2005)

William Golding was born in Cornwall, England on September 19, 1911. Although educated to be a scientist at the request of his father, he developed an interest in literature. At Oxford University, he studied natural science for two years and then transferred to a program for English literature and philosophy. He eventually became a schoolmaster at Bishop Wordsworth's School in Salisbury. During World War II, he joined the Royal Navy and was involved in the sinking of the German battleship Bismarck. After the war, he returned to Bishop Wordsworth's School and taught there until 1962. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, was published in 1954 and was made into a film in 1963. His other novels include The Inheritors, Free Fall, The Spire, The Pyramid, The Paper Men, Close Quarters, and Fire down Below. He won the Booker Prize for Rites of Passage in 1980 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1983. He also wrote plays, essays, and short stories. He was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1988. He died on June 19, 1993.

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