Losing Your Parents, Finding Yourself: The Defining Turning Point of Adult Life

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Hyperion Books, Apr 25, 2001 - Family & Relationships - 384 pages
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An eloquent book that explores the impact on one's life of losing a parent as an adult, and the effect it has on families, careers, and friendships--now in paperback.

Losing a parent is an event that happens, sooner or later, to nearly everyone. Yet seldom has the impact of parental death on the identities of adult offspring been examined. This book fills that gap. Backed by her original study and filled with compelling case histories, Secunda's book explores what happens to men and women when they are on their own in ways they have never been before. She addresses myriad issues, including:

  • What does it mean to be living without parents to please or rebel against?
  • How does adult "orphanhood" alter relationships with one's siblings, partner, friends, children, or one's career choices?
  • How does it reshape one's sense of self?
Losing Your Parents, Finding Your Self offers the assurance that out of loss can come unforeseen gain--that on the other side of sorrow, we can discover new hope, wisdom, and strength.

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Losing your parents, finding your self: the defining turning point of adult life

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As the baby-boom generation moves into middle age, their own aging parents are dying in record numbers. What does it mean to become an "adult orphan"? Strangely, this momentous event in adulthood has ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Victoria Secunda is an award-winning author, journalist, and lecturer whose previous books include When You and Your Mother Can't Be Friends, Women and Their Fathers, and When Madness Comes Home. Her work has appeared in Harper's Bazaar, Woman's Day, and Glamour. A frequent guest on network television and radio programs, she lives with her husband, photographer Shel Secunda, in Connecticut. Both her parents are deceased.

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