Lotteries

Front Cover
Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1989 - Political Science - 140 pages
0 Reviews

Economic pressure on states in the 1980s have led a number in this country to market lotteries in an unprecedentedly aggressive manner. This book was inspired by the author's experience with the New Jersey state lottery during a period of major growth. Karcher examines lotteries from a historical, psychological, and philosophical perspective, offering a reflective and cogent explanation of their popularity. He looks at the fluctuating popularity of state-sponsored gambling and the consequent peaking and fattening of revenues, exposing the measures lottery commissions sometimes take in order to increase revenues.

Self policed lottery commissions, he predicts, will resort to marketing abuses and increasingly prey upon the poor if they are given unbridled power to act. Karcher suggests thoughtful, easily implemented, and constructive reforms. As more state governments inevitably turn to lotteries as a way out of tax dilemmas, this book will contribute to the public discourse on this important policy issue.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
1
IV
11
V
19
VI
27
VII
37
VIII
47
IX
54
X
64
XI
72
XII
91
XIII
98
XIV
101
XV
108
XVI
113
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - The Lottery, with its weekly pay-out of enormous prizes, was the one public event to which the proles paid serious attention. It was probable that there were some millions of proles for whom the Lottery was the principal if not the only reason for remaining alive. It was their delight, their folly, their anodyne, their intellectual stimulant.

References to this book

Bibliographic information