Louis Agassiz: His Life and Correspondence, Volume 1

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Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz
Houghton, Mifflin, 1885 - Naturalists - 794 pages
 

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Page 336 - ... shut up during a long period in an icy mantle. Once grant to Agassiz that his deepest valleys of Switzerland, such as the enormous chasm of the lake of Geneva, were formerly filled with solid snow and ice, and I see no stopping-place. From that hypothesis you may proceed to fill the Baltic and Northern Seas, cover Southern England, and half of Germany and Russia with similar icy sheets...
Page 178 - When be woke it disappeared from his memory as before. Hoping that the same experience might be repeated, on the third night he placed a pencil and paper beside his bed before going to sleep. Accordingly...
Page 384 - the exaggeration of religious fanaticism, borrowing fragments from science imperfectly, or not at all, understood, and then making use of them to prescribe to scientific men what they are allowed to see or to find in nature.
Page 359 - And yet I have not much hope of this, since all the attempts of my friends to obtain subscriptions for me in France and Russia have failed : because the French government takes no interest in what is done out of Paris ; and in Russia such researches, having little direct utility, are looked upon with indifference. Do you think any position would be open to me in the United States...
Page 61 - If it be absolutely essential to your happiness that you should break the ice of the two poles in order to find the hairs of a mammoth, or that you should dry your shirt in the sun of the tropics, at least wait till your trunk is packed and your passports are signed before you talk with us about it. Begin by reaching your first aim, a physician's and surgeon's diploma. I will not for the present hear of anything else, and that is more than enough.
Page 177 - He had been for two weeks striving to decipher the somewhat obscure impression of a fossil fish on the stone slab in which it was preserved. Weary and perplexed, he put his work aside at last, and tried to dismiss it from his mind. Shortly after, he waked one night persuaded that while asleep he had seen his fish with all the missing features perfectly restored. But when he tried to hold and make fast the image, it escaped him. Nevertheless, he went early to the Jardin des Plantes, thinking that...
Page xvii - Mai, 1807." things, was an intellectual tendency, and not simply a child's disposition to find friends and playmates in the animals about him. In later years her sympathy gave her the key to the work of his manhood, as it had done to the sports of his childhood. She remained his most intimate friend to the last hour of her life, and he survived her but six years. Louis's love of natural history showed itself almost from infancy. When a very little fellow he had, beside his collection of fishes, all...
Page 90 - He liked merry society, but he himself was in general reserved and never noisy. He picked out the gifted and highly learned students, and would not waste his time in ordinary conversation. Often, when he saw a number of students going off on some empty pleasuretrip, he said to me : ' There they go with the other fellows : their motto is. Ich gehe mit den andern. I will go my own way, Mr. Dinkel, — and not alone: I will be a leader of others.
Page 365 - One may consider it as henceforth proved that the embryo of the fish during its development, the class of fishes as it at present exists in its numerous families, and the type of...
Page 379 - Association is to meet here about the middle of June, and I trust that the occasion will again bring you to England and give me the great happiness of entertaining you in Trinity College. Indeed, I wish very much to see you ; for many years have now elapsed since I last had that pleasure. May God long preserve your life, which has been spent in promoting the great ends of truth and knowledge ! Your great work on fossil fishes is now before me, and I also possess the first number of your monograph...

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