Love-letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister: With the History of Their Adventures. In Three Parts

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D. Brown, J. Tonson, J. Nicholson, B. Tooke, and G. Strahan, 1712 - 505 pages
 

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User Review  - Smiler69 - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this 17th century roman clef which may have inspired Les Liaisons Dangereuses a century later, one of my all-time favourite classic novels with people behaving very badly indeed ... Read full review

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Page 37 - Cesario to my Philander ? If a Monarchy you design, then why not this King, this great, this good, this Royal Forgiver ? This, who was born a King, and born your King ; and holds his Crown by Right of Nature, by Right of Law, by Right of Heaven itself; Heaven who has preserv'd him, and confirm'd him ours, by a thousand miraculous Escapes and Sufferings, and indulg'd him ours by ten thousand Acts of Mercy, and endear'd him to us by his wondrous Care and Conduct, by securing of Peace, Plenty, Ease...
Page 16 - ... to my faithless Charmer ! But if a sense of Honour in you has made you resolve to prefer mine before your Love, made you take up a noble fatal Resolution never to tell me more of your Passion; this were a Trial, I fear my fond Heart wants Courage to bear; or is it a Trick, a cold Fit only assum'd to try how much I love you ? I have no Arts, Heav'n knows, no Guile or double Meaning in my Soul, 'tis all plain native Simplicity...
Page 14 - ... Maid that cannot fly : Ungenerous and unkind ! why did you take advantage of those Freedoms I gave you as a Brother ? I smil'd on you, and sometimes kiss'd you too ; But for my Sister's sake, I play'd with you, suffer'd your Hands and Lips to wander where I dare not now; all which I thought a Sister might allow a Brother, and knew not all the while the Treachery of Love : Oh none, but under that intimate Title of a Brother, could have had the Opportunity to have ruin'd me; that, that...
Page 60 - Heav'ns! would you make a Mistress of me ? Says he A Mistress, what would'st thou be a Cherubin ? then I reply'd as before 1 am no Whore, Sir, No, crys he, but I can quickly make thee one, I have my Tools about me, Sweet-heart, therefore let's lose no time ; but fall to work...
Page 26 - ... should be betray'd and ruin'd ! but not to terrify you longer with Fears of my Danger, the Dish came, and out the Strawberries were pour'd, and the Basket thrown aside on the Bank where my Mother sate, (for we were in the Garden when we met accidentally Dorillus first with the Basket;) there were some Leaves of Fern put at the Bottom between the Basket and Letter, which by good Fortune came not out with the Strawberries, and after a Minute or two I took up the Basket, and walking carelessly up...
Page 120 - Love, and set a Value on each other's Merits, and where both understand to take and pay; who find the Beauty of each other's Minds, and rate 'em as they ought; whom not a formal Ceremony binds, (with which I've nought to do, but dully give a cold consenting...
Page 36 - What one cruel or angry thing has he committed in all the time of his fortunate and peaceable Reign over us ? Whose Ox or whose Ass has he unjustly taken ? What Orphan wrong'd, or Widow's Tears neglected ? But all his Life has been one continued Miracle ; all good, all gracious, calm and merciful: And this good, this Godlike King is mark'd out for Slaughter, design'da Sacrifice to the private Revenge of a few ambitious Knaves and Rebels, whose Pretence is the publick Good, and doom'd to be...
Page 322 - charge him with a thousand crimes of having given himself over to effeminacy; as indeed he grew too lazy in her arms; neglecting glory, arms, and power, for the more real joys of life; while she ... grows so bold and hardy
Page 2 - Father and Daughter, Brother and Sister met, and reap'd the Joys of Love without Controul, and counted it Religious Coupling, and 'twas encourag'd too by Heav'n it self: Therefore start not (too nice and lovely Maid) at Shadows of things that can but frighten Fools.
Page 13 - I die to see you. To PHILANDER NOT yet ? — not yet ? oh ye dull tedious Hours when will you glide away ? and bring that happy Moment on, in which I shall at least hear from my Philander ; eight and forty tedious ones are past, and I am here forgotten still; forlorn, impatient, restless every where; not one of all your little Moments (ye undiverting Hours) can afford me Repose ; I drag ye on, a heavy Load ; I count ye all, and bless ye when you...

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