Loving Garbo

Front Cover
Pimlico, Mar 1, 1995 - 276 pages
Mercedes de Acosta was a notorious figure. She had been brought up as a boy and had taken a girlfriend on her honeymoon. Her conquests included Isadora Duncan and Marlene Dietrich. Cecil Beaton first meet Garbo at a party in 1932. But it was more than a decade before they became lovers. Despite her possessive friends and the presence of an increasingly sinister Mercedes, Garbo and Beaton spent many passionate months together in New York and California. For the rest of their lives, Mercedes and Beaton remained enthralled by a star who gave them little in return. Through his careful reading of the papers of Mercedes de Acosta and his unrivalled access to Beaton's estate, Hugo Vickers has produced a rich and fascinating account which throws light for the first time on many of the mysteries surrounding Garbo and her remarkable admirers.

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LOVING GARBO: The Story of Greta Garbo, Cecil Beaton, and Mercedes de Acosta

User Review  - Kirkus

An engrossing chronicle of Garbo's sexual friendships with Mercedes de Acosta and Cecil Beaton, based on letters, journals, and personal interviews. Vickers (Vivien Leigh, 1989, etc.) has had access ... Read full review

Loving Garbo: the story of Greta Garbo, Cecil Beaton, and Mercedes de Acosta

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Vickers has capitalized on his position as Cecil Beaton's literary executor to write this account of the relations between Greta Garbo, sometime writer de Acosta, and designer-photographer Beaton ... Read full review

Contents

Friends and Lovers i
1
Cecil
26
We make love with anyone we find
42
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Hugo Vickers' books include Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece; Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough; Cecil Beaton; Vivien Leigh; Loving Garbo; Royal Orders; The Private World of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor; and The Kiss, which won the 1996 Stern Silver Pen for Non-fiction.

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