Loving an Adult Child of an Alcoholic

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M. Evans, May 25, 2007 - Self-Help - 240 pages
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The child of an alcoholic develops patterns of behavior during childhood which carry over into adult life. As children they were taught to cover up the family secret and suppress their feelings. No matter what is going on, as adults, when asked how she or he is doing your partner will likely answer "fine." Distrust, fear of abandonment, and sensitivity to criticism are all major issues for your adult child. Recognizing these patterns and changing the ones that cause problems will help you and your partner enjoy a deeper relationship.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 You Arent Reading this by Accident
7
2 Entering the Mind Field
29
3 Putting the Fun Back in Dysfunction
53
4 The PushPull of Commitment and Trust
65
5 The Paradox of Chronic Tension
79
6 He had a Hat
91
7 They Dont Know Theyre Beautiful
103
11 Too Nice
135
12 Parenting is Scary for Most PeopleEspecially Your Adult Child
149
13 ACOAs Frequently Dread Social Occasions
161
14 Birds of a Feather
173
15 Tending to Your Relationship
181
16 Dealing with Addiction Problems
189
17 Religion Helps Us
199
Conclusion
213

8 Mountains from Molehills
113
9 You Get to Make the Important Decisions and Your ACOA Makes the Rest
121
10 Nurturing Your Partners Inner Child
127
Resources
219
Index
225
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About the author (2007)

Dr. Douglas Bey is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, served as a board examiner for the American Board of Neurology and Psychiatry for many years, was past president of his county medical society, his hospital medical staff, and his county board of health. Deborah Bey is an adult child of an alcoholic. She trained at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis and was the head nurse on a hospital chemical dependency unit for a number of years. She later worked in a multidisciplinary private psychiatric group practice with Dr. Bey where she counseled ACOAs on an individual and group basis.

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