Low Reynolds number hydrodynamics: with special applications to particulate media

Front Cover
Springer Netherlands, Aug 31, 1981 - Science - 553 pages
One studying the motion of fluids relative to particulate systems is soon impressed by the dichotomy which exists between books covering theoretical and practical aspects. Classical hydrodynamics is largely concerned with perfect fluids which unfortunately exert no forces on the particles past which they move. Practical approaches to subjects like fluidization, sedimentation, and flow through porous media abound in much useful but uncorrelated empirical information. The present book represents an attempt to bridge this gap by providing at least the beginnings of a rational approach to fluid particle dynamics, based on first principles. From the pedagogic viewpoint it seems worthwhile to show that the Navier-Stokes equations, which form the basis of all systematic texts, can be employed for useful practical applications beyond the elementary problems of laminar flow in pipes and Stokes law for the motion of a single particle. Although a suspension may often be viewed as a continuum for practical purposes, it really consists of a discrete collection of particles immersed in an essentially continuous fluid. Consideration of the actual detailed boundary value problems posed by this viewpoint may serve to call attention to the limitation of idealizations which apply to the overall transport properties of a mixture of fluid and solid particles.

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