M. Butterfly

Front Cover
Dramatists Play Service Inc, 1988 - Drama - 93 pages
9 Reviews
John Alcock reviews the controversy that has surrounded evolutionary studies of human social behavior following the 1975 publication of E.O. Wilson's classic, Sociobiology, the New Synthesis. Denounced vehemently as an ideology that has justified social evils and inequalities, sociobiology has survived the assault. Twenty-five years after the field was named by Wilson, the approach he championed has successfully demonstrated its value in the study of animal behavior, including the behavior of our own species. Yet, misconceptions remain. In this objective approach to the sociobiology debate, animal behaviorist John Alcock illuminates how sociobiologists study behavior in all species. He confronts the chief scientific and ideological objections head on, with an analysis of case histories that involve such topics as sexual jealousy, beauty, gender difference, parent-offspring relations, and rape.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - REINADECOPIAYPEGA - LibraryThing

Most people I talk to when discussing a book/play that has been made into a film, will invariably say to me ' the book was better'. I don't know if people have said this about M Butterfly, but if they ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - CareBear36 - LibraryThing

I really enjoyed this play. My friend recommended it to me, saying, "It's about this gay guy..." Since this wasn't a very detailed description, I wasn't sure what to expect, but once I started reading ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
4
Section 3
5
Section 4
7
Section 5
35
Section 6
60
Section 7
70
Section 8
75
Section 9
78
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About the author (1988)

The son of immigrant Chinese parents, Hwang attended Stanford University and the Yale Drama School and has been a director and a teacher of playwriting. FOB (1981), which stands for "Fresh off the boat,"' explores the conflicts between two Chinese Americans and a Chinese exchange student still steeped in the customs and beliefs of the old world. It won an Obie Award in 1981. The Dance and the Railroad (1982) concerns an artist and his fellow workers who stage a strike to protest the inhuman conditions suffered by Chinese railroad workers in the American West in the nineteenth century. M Butterfly (1988), about the relationship between an American man and a Chinese transvestite, won the Tony Award as best play of the year. Maxine Hong Kingston wrote, "David Hwang has an ear for Chinatown English, the language of childhood and the subconscious, the language of emotion, the language of home.

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