M. or N. Similia similibus curantur, Volume 1

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Tauchnitz, 1869
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Page 25 - we scarce can sink as low For men at most differ as Heaven and earth, But women, worst and best, as Heaven and Hell.
Page 171 - But that is all rubbish," the German would cry, after spending an hour in going through some trashy modern Italian music. "Now, my child, you shall hear something worth listening to;" and with a sigh of relief he would turn to some old piece by Mozart or Bach, some minuet of Haydn's, some romance of Beethoven's, which he would play with no great power of execution, indeed, but with a rare sweetness and delicacy of touch and expression, and with an intense absorption in the music, which communicated...
Page 241 - Your room? Which is that?" asked Graham. "This one — next to papa," she said, pointing to the door that led into the passage. " Yes, you can stay there if you like ; but don't you think you would be better with Madame Lavaux, than all by yourself in there?" "No, I would rather stay here," she answered, and then pausing a moment at the door, " I may come and see him presently ?" she added wistfully, " I always nursed him when he was ill before." " I am sure you are a very good little nurse," said...
Page 54 - N ;, p. 31. Long before he had reached his uncle's house, he had made up his mind to GO IN, as he called it, FOR Miss Bruce, morally confident of winning, yet troubled with certain chilling misgivings, as fearing that this time he had really fallen in love. 1870. Agricultural Jour., Feb.
Page 287 - ... as universally requested, without delay. BOOTS AND SADDLES. " The ring of a bridle, the stamp of a hoof, Stars above, and a wind in the tree, — A bush for a billet, — a rock for a roof, — Outpost duty's the duty for me ! Listen. A stir in the valley below — The valley below is with riflemen crammed, Covering the column and watching the foe — Trumpet-major ! — Sound and be d...
Page 275 - M. Linders had exhausted his strength and his passion for the moment, and answered quietly enough. No, he had made no will, he said — of what use? Everything he had was hers, of course — little enough too, as matters stood. He owned he did not know what was to become of her; he had made no arrangements — he had never thought of its coming to this, and then he had always counted on leaving her a fortune. He had sometimes thought of letting her be brought up for the stage; that might be arranged...
Page 214 - Court Guide, visiting-list — all such aids to memory — the charts, as it were, of that voyage which begins in the middle of April, and ends with the last week in July. As usual on great undertakings, from the opening of a campaign to the issuing of invitations for a ball, too much had been left to the last moment ; there was a great deal to do, and little time to do it. "We can't get on without you, Miss Bruce...
Page 26 - The lopping of a limb is a painful process, but above a gangrened wound experienced surgeons amputate without scruple or remorse. On the other hand, a true woman's affection is of all earthly influences the 'noblest and most elevating. It encourages the highest and gentlest qualities of man's nature — his enterprise, courage, patience, sympathy, above all, his trust. Happy the pilgrim on whose life such a beacon-star has shone out to guide him in the right way ; thrice happy if it sets not until...
Page 41 - cried the astonished lady, fanning herself vigorously with her pocket-handkerchief. She was discomfited though she had won the victory, and hailed the return of her partner with the eau sucree as a relief. " A thousand thanks, M. Jules ! What if we take another turn, though this room really is of an insufferable heat." Madelon was left confronting Horace, a most ill-used little girl, not crying, but with flushed cheeks and pouting lips — a little girl who had lost her game and her bonbons, and...
Page 289 - VOL. i. u you receive this letter. I am dying, a fact which may possess some faint interest for you even now — or may not — that is not to the purpose either. It is not of myself that I would speak, but of my child. I am sending her to you, The'rese, as to the only relative she has in the world...

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