Machines that Walk: The Adaptive Suspension Vehicle

Front Cover
MIT Press, 1989 - Computers - 314 pages
What is 16 feet long, 10 feet high, weighs 6,000 pounds, has six legs, and can sprint at 8 mph and step over a 4 foot wall? The Adaptive Suspension Vehicle (ASV) described in this book.

Machines That Walk provides the first in depth treatment of the "statically stable walking machine" theory employed in the design of the ASV, the most sophisticated, self contained, and practical walking machine being developed today. Under construction at Ohio State University, the automatically terrain adaptive ASV has one human operator, can carry a 500 pound payload and is expected to have better fuel economy and mobility than that of conventional wheeled and tracked vehicles in rough terrain.

The development of the ASV is a milestone in robotics research, and Machines That Walk provides a wealth of research results in mobility, gait, static stability, leg design, and vertical geometry design. The authors' treatment of statically stable gait theory and actuator coordination is by far the most complete available.

Shin Min Song is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Kenneth J. Waldron is Nordholt Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Ohio State University.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Survey of Walking Machines
11
Background for Gait Analysis
23
Gaits for Irregular Terrain
99
Coordination
151
Leg Design by FourBar Linkage Synthesis 105
165
Design of a Pantograph Leg
223
Motion Controlled Ankle Design
265
The Adaptive Suspension Vehicle
283
Bibliography
301
Index
309
Copyright

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