Macho!

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Simon and Schuster, Feb 7, 2012 - Fiction - 227 pages
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From a pioneer of modern U.S. Hispanic literature, and the New York Times bestselling author of Crazy Loco Love and Rain of Gold, comes a gripping, coming-of-age tale that exposes the intensity and sheer will of one brave young immigrant who crosses the Mexican border.

Roberto Garcia is only seventeen, but he already has big dreams of making his fortune, building a family, and gaining the respect of his community. With ambition to burn and a passion to prove his manhood, Roberto takes the dangerous journey north, crossing the Mexican border to pick fruit in the “golden fields” of California. It is said that a good man can make more money there in a week than in an entire year in the mountains of Michoacán, his home. With dreams that overshadow harsh realities, Roberto is unprepared for the jammed boxcars and bolted trucks that carry undervalued migrant workers through the searing desert to long days of harsh labor.

Raw, powerful, poetic, and heartbreaking, Macho! brings to life the brutality of migrant labor, Cesar Chavez’s efforts to unionize workers, and a vivid portrayal of the immigrant experience through the eyes of a brave young man who bids goodbye to everything he knows to follow his dreams.
 

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Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
9
Section 3
15
Section 4
19
Section 5
25
Section 6
31
Section 7
41
Section 8
49
Section 15
107
Section 16
113
Section 17
119
Section 18
123
Section 19
131
Section 20
141
Section 21
151
Section 22
163

Section 9
61
Section 10
67
Section 11
73
Section 12
81
Section 13
91
Section 14
97
Section 23
173
Section 24
181
Section 25
197
Section 26
209
Section 27
215
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Victor VillaseÑor is a writer whose works have brought Mexican-American culture and literature to a wide audience. Born in the barrio of Carlsbad, California in 1940, Victor VillaseÑor was raised on a ranch four miles north in Oceanside. Since his parents were born in Mexico, VillaseÑor spoke only Spanish at home until he began school. After years of facing language and cultural barriers, heavy discrimination and a reading disability, later diagnosed as dyslexia. Victor dropped out of high school during his junior year in high school and moved to Mexico. There he discovered a wealth of Mexican art, literature, and music that helped him recapture and understand the dignity and richness of his heritage.

Victor returned to the U.S. at the age of 20. He began to feel the old frustration and rage return as he witnessed again the disregard toward poor and uneducated people and especially toward Mexicans. Then a chance encounter with James Joyce’s Portrait Of An Artist As A Young Man changed Victor’s life. It awakened a desire to confront through literature the problems associated with his cultural heritage that continued to plague him.

A gifted and accomplished speaker, Victor VillaseÑor, in his candid and heartfelt manner, brings a fresh perspective to a number of universal themes, including pride in heritage, the strength of family, world peace, the power of the written word, and dedication to education and personal achievement.

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