Maconaquah's story: the saga of Frances Slocum

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LeClere Pub., 2000 - Fiction - 172 pages
2 Reviews
When little Frances Slocum was abducted by Delaware Indians during the Revolutionary War, she found it a pleasurable change from her austere life in a Quaker household. Growing up with the Indians,Frances became more Indian than white, even to turning against the white people who were ravaging the Indian way of life. Her family's many searches for her were in vain, so she grew to adulthood as Sheletawash, eventually marrying the Miami Chief, Shepoconah, whom they rescued after a battle. He gave he the Miami name, Maconaquah, and took her to live with his people along the Mississinewa River in Indiana. During the timer her family grew, the American government agents where annually whittling down the Indian lands, eventually forcing them to evacuate. This fear led Maconaquah to tell her secret shame, thinking it might help her to remain, but had the opposite effect enabling the Slocum's to finally find their long lost sister--60 years later. In spite of Maconaquah's apprehensions, kinship eventually worked its magic---along with some help from the Great Spirit. The author will gladly inscribe your book upon request. Shipping charges will also be added to order.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - laytonwoman3rd - LibraryThing

Frances Slocum was abducted from her family home near Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, by three Delaware Indians on November 2, 1778. She was five years old, one of the youngest of 10 children of her ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - laytonwoman3rd - LibraryThing

Frances Slocum was abducted from her family home near Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, by three Delaware Indians on November 2, 1778. She was five years old, one of the youngest of 10 children of her ... Read full review

Contents

WilkesBarre to Deaf Mans Village
99
Epilogue
155
Bennett Journal conclusion
161
Copyright

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